There's a whole host of kick-ass ladies hidden in history like gems, women who gave a middle finger to the kind of status quo that went far beyond a glass ceiling or anything that we modern ladies take for granted. It's as infuriating as it is intriguing and exciting to learn about women like Dr. Clelia Duel Mosher, who was researching the sexual habits of Victorians -- Victorians! -- way before Kinsey was a twinkle in his mother's eye.

Then there's the fabulous Hedy Lamarr, whose glamour goddess career was, for a long time, the focus of any interest in her, before it was revealed that she helped invent the technology that laid the groundwork for CDMA and Wi-Fi -- technology that was meant to discombobulate Nazis but also led to cell phones, for the love of whatever! Whatever happened to her biopic? We're still waiting, folks!

Ada Lovelace is another groundbreaking woman whose work contributed to something you and I use every single day -- the personal computer. Lovelace, a countess whose father was Lord Byron, was a math whiz who was the first person to create a program for Charles Babbage's designs for analytical engines, a very early computer.

Earlier this week, Production Weekly's tantalizing Twitter feed mentioned that Ada would finally be getting her due in a period drama called Enchantress of Numbers, which was Babbage's nickname for Lovelace, and that Zooey Deschanel is in talks to play her. Bruce Beresford, who is probably most famous for directing Driving Miss Daisy, Tender Mercies, and Crimes of the Heart, will be helming this project.

Is Deschanel going to break out of her admittedly charming (to me, at least) manic pixie girl status with this project? Is she going to bring it for the woman who's inspired countless other ladies in the field of technology, even garnering her own grassroots holiday of sorts, Ada Lovelace Day?

What will the gist of the plot be? Who will play Charles Babbage? So many questions, but for now
I am hoping that this project, which is supposed to start shooting this fall, will show the world the notable and oft-overlooked contributions of Lovelace and offer Deschanel to stretch her acting muscles.