Can superheroes be made, not born? It's a question 'Kick-Ass' tackles head-on.

Adapted from the comic books by Mark Millar and John S. Romita Jr., 'Kick-Ass' turns preconceived notions of herodom on its head, as it follows your normal, everyday comic-book loving geek, Dave (Aaron Johnson,) as he dons a tight-fitting wetsuit and mask and acts the part of his revered superhero.

Dave soon discovers that being a vigilante isn't as easy as it seems. But thanks to the power of viral video, the do-it-yourself upstart -- and his alter-ego, Kick-Ass -- quickly become a worldwide phenomenon.

This newfound notoriety also gets him in touch with fellow characters Red Mist ('Superbad's Christopher Mintz-Plasse), as well as Big Daddy and Hit Girl (Nicolas Cage and Chloë Grace Moretz), a father-daughter duo who aim to take down the crime circuit of a local mobster.

An unabashedly R-rated film directed by Matthew Vaughn ('Layer Cake'), 'Kick-Ass' exhibits strong language and violence that should serve to give parents pause before allowing their kids on this big-screen comic book adventure. Scene-stealer Moretz in particular beats up bad guys with a bloodlust beyond her years and unleashes heaping amounts of profanity (including one Crass Word That Shall Not Be Named) that could make sailors blush.

But you don't have to take our word for it. Read what the critics had to say: Can superheroes be made, not born? It's a question 'Kick-Ass' tackles head-on.

Adapted from the comic books by Mark Millar and John S. Romita Jr., 'Kick-Ass' turns preconceived notions of herodom on its head, as it follows your normal, everyday comic-book loving geek, Dave (Aaron Johnson,) as he dons a tight-fitting wetsuit and mask and acts the part of his revered superhero.

Dave soon discovers that being a vigilante isn't as easy as it seems. But thanks to the power of viral video, the do-it-yourself upstart -- and his alter-ego, Kick-Ass -- quickly become a worldwide phenomenon.

This newfound notoriety also gets him in touch with fellow characters Red Mist ('Superbad's Christopher Mintz-Plasse), as well as Big Daddy and Hit Girl (Nicolas Cage and Chloë Grace Moretz), a father-daughter duo who aim to take down the crime circuit of a local mobster.

An unabashedly R-rated film directed by Matthew Vaughn ('Layer Cake'), 'Kick-Ass' exhibits strong language and violence that should serve to give parents pause before allowing their kids on this big-screen comic book adventure. Scene-stealer Moretz in particular beats up bad guys with a bloodlust beyond her years and unleashes heaping amounts of profanity (including one Crass Word That Shall Not Be Named) that could make sailors blush.

But you don't have to take our word for it. Here's what the critics had to say:

Entertainment Weekly: "An enjoyably supercharged and ultraviolent teen-rebel comic-book fantasy that might be described -- in spirit, at least -- as reality-based. ... Is it a problem that 'Kick-Ass' is by far the most violent movie ever to feature kids as heroes? Parents should consider themselves warned, though personally, I just wish that the film had ended up a bit less of an over-the-top action ride. It didn't need this much slam-bang when it had us at real-life superheroics."

New York Magazine: "In schizoid fashion, I both spluttered and enjoyed myself. ... 'Kick-Ass' is a compendium of all sleazy things, and it sings like a siren to our inner Tarantinos."

Roger Ebert
: "
Shall I have feelings, or should I pretend to be cool? Will I seem hopelessly square if I find 'Kick-Ass' morally reprehensible and will I appear to have missed the point? ... This movie regards human beings like video-game targets. Kill one, and you score. They're dead, you win. When kids in the age range of this movie's home video audience are shooting one another every day in America, that kind of stops being funny."

'Kick-Ass' trailer


Associated Press: "Director Matthew Vaughn has made an action comedy so bloody funny -- double emphasis on bloody --fans might need to see it again just to catch the gags they missed from laughing so hard the first time. The film is seriously, nastily violent, both satirizing the excesses of superhero flicks and showing genuine, hurtful consequences of the cartoon action Hollywood serves up."

San Jose Mercury News: "Director Matthew Vaughn and most of his cast, especially Chloë Grace Moretz as a foul-mouthed girl assassin, do deserve their props. They make a solid team, but no matter how capable each is, none can make an emotional connection with the audience -- because the picture lacks a soul amid the carnage."

Arizona Republic: "
While not all of the elements fit together tonally, on the surface level -- the level that the title suggests -- "Kick-Ass" does exactly what it's supposed to, as long as you're game for the language and the gutting."

Orlando Sentinel: "Crude, bloody and moody, 'Kick-Ass' embraces, at arm's length, its fanboy origins. But maybe they should have decided if they loved these stereotypes, or wanted to ridicule them to death before rolling the camera."

St. Petersburg Times: "
A rabid puppy of a movie, energetically bounding off the screen and into your lap, where it proceeds to chew off your face. Like all puppies, Matthew Vaughn's movie ignores the rules of proper behavior, even for comic book adaptations, like don't show an 11-year-old girl dishing out and taking bloody beatdowns, and calling bad guys The Word Women Absolutely Hate.That morality-watchdog-howl-in-the-making is the budding superhero Hit Girl (Chloë Moretz), and although 'Kick-Ass' isn't exactly her movie, she steals it as if she owns it."




CATEGORIES Reviews