Death becomes 'Death at a Funeral,' according to most major critics, who enjoyed the ribald slapstick and over-the-top behavior of its all-star cast, which includes Chris Rock, Martin Lawrence, Luke Wilson, Danny Glover, Regina Hall, James Marsden, Tracy Morgan and Zoe Saldana.

It's a remake of the 2007 Brit film of the same name -- also written by the same Dean Craig -- but instead of a depiction of a high class British funeral, we have here an African-American funeral in Pasadena, Calif. Dad has died and the family comes together to pay their last respects. But soon there's a series of revelations, family bickering, threats, blackmail, a drug freakout and a lost corpse to keep things lively. Peter Dinklage reprises his role from the original, which was directed by Frank Oz..

Neil LaBute is the director here and Rock produces.

Read what the critics think. Death becomes 'Death at a Funeral,' according to most major critics, who enjoyed the ribald slapstick and over-the-top behavior of its all-star cast, which includes Chris Rock, Martin Lawrence, Luke Wilson, Danny Glover, Regina Hall, James Marsden, Tracy Morgan and Zoe Saldana.

It's a remake of the 2007 Brit film of the same name -- also written by the same Dean Craig -- but instead of a depiction of a high class British funeral, we have here an African-American funeral in Pasadena, Calif. Dad has died and the family comes together to pay their last respects. But soon there's a series of revelations, family bickering, threats, blackmail, a drug freakout and a lost corpse to keep things lively. Peter Dinklage reprises his role from the original, which was directed by Frank Oz..

Neil LaBute is the director here and Rock produces.

Here's what the critics think.

Roger Ebert: "Consider the scene when Uncle Russell eats too much nut cake and is seized by diarrhea. And Norman wrestles him off his wheelchair and onto the potty, and gets his hand stuck underneath. Reader, I laughed. I'm not saying I'm proud of myself. That's not the way I was raised. But I laughed."

Associated Press: "Now, LaBute would seem an odd choice for a family comedy, having made his name with far darker, crueler humor in movies like 'In the Company of Men' and 'The Shape of Things.' But perhaps the twisted elements of the story appealed to him, including hallucinogenic drugs, a profane grandpa and a gay midget lover.

Orlando Sentinal: "The new 'Funeral,' directed by social commentator-director Neil LaBute ('Lakeview Terrace') doesn't improve on the original, which wasn't exactly a classic despite its classic structure. The 'mysterious stranger' (Peter Dinklage) is the same in both films, a little man with a big family secret. But in filling the cast with funny people, none of whom has to carry the picture, LaBute allows Tracy Morgan, Chris Rock, Loretta Devine, Danny Glover and Marsden to score without trying too hard."

'Death at a Funeral' trailer

Variety: "But this slavishly faithful update, again written by Dean Craig (who seems to have exhumed his original script and added a few jokes about Louis Armstrong and R. Kelly), fails to tap into anything culturally specific or uniquely funny in its Pasadena setting or its theoretically looser, livelier black cast. And because the characters are so flat, we couldn't care less about the blows to their sense of propriety."

The Hollywood Reporter: "This predictably doesn't much matter because the remake's producer and star, Chris Rock, has assembled a stellar cast that, as he put it at the film's premiere, includes just about every black performer not in a Tyler Perry movie. So the domestic audiences that failed to turn out for a moderately funny British farce will come in much greater numbers to see this moderately funny American farce."

Time Out New York: "Nude, hallucinogen-fueled jaunts on rooftops, revelations about same-sex relationships -- with a little person, no less -- and individuals covered in feces are all executed with verve by the typically misanthropic Neil LaBute. It's his formidable cast (which also includes Luke Wilson, Peter Dinklage, James Marsden and Danny Glover) that really keep things moving, though their ability to generate postmortem yuks by brute comedic force never quite compensates for the middling slapstick nature of the high jinks and an over-reliance on easy poop and gay-panic gags."

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