Let me go out on a limb and say that Christopher Nolan's Inception is only my second most anticipated movie of 2010 -- the #1 spot goes to Vincenzo Natali's polarizing sci-fi thriller Splice, the new trailer for which you can view here. (It's been a long and painful struggle to avoid the Splice spoilers floating around the net from its Sundance premiere.) But I'm still quite psyched about Nolan's trippy follow-up to The Dark Knight. Details about the plot have been sparse, but there are quite a few interesting tidbits to be found in yesterday's long LA Times feature about the project. If you're as curious about the film as the rest of us on Cinematical, I commend the article to you -- it doesn't appear to be unduly spoilerish, and seems to really grok the geeky intellectual appeal of Nolan's films.

The article must have been part of Warner Bros. PR strategy for the film, since it coincided with the premiere of some new footage at WonderCon on Saturday, where some of these details were also apparently revealed.


Money quote from the LA Times article for those interested in a synopsis:
The film stars Leonardo DiCaprio as a specialist in the new branch of corporate espionage -- he's a dream thief who plucks secrets from the minds of tycoons after pumping them full of drugs and hooking them up to a mysterious contraption. The problem, though, is the land of nod can be volatile -- as can DiCaprio's character, Dom Cobb, who is a wounded dreamer after the loss of his beloved wife.
There are more interesting details, including the description of a fight scene in a rotating hallway that apparently caused co-star Joseph Gordon-Levitt considerable misery, and Nolan's discussion of the origins of the film: he's interested in the metaphysical aspects of dreaming; the notion of lucid dreaming, and the idea that dreams are an alternate reality rather than just a mental state. It's not a new concept, but not many films have actually taken it at their subject.

Best of all, it doesn't sound like Inception makes any concessions to its status as a summer blockbuster. I'm hoping for something as riveting and relentlessly brainy as The Prestige.