TAGS Avatar, p2p, piracy
CATEGORIES Movie News
For decades, Japan has been on the cutting edge of technology, providing the world with the latest advances in cell phones, game consoles and personal computing. Now it appears they are poised to take the lead in another emerging tech field: piracy.

The prevention of piracy, that is. According to the Hollywood Reporter, Japan has begun a high-tech crackdown on digital piracy by racking up their first arrest for P2P downloading using a new tracking system that allows them to detect when people are illegally accessing copyrighted material. For decades, Japan has been on the cutting edge of technology, providing the world with the latest advances in cell phones, game consoles and personal computing. Now it appears they are poised to take the lead in another emerging tech field: piracy.

The prevention of piracy, that is. According to the Hollywood Reporter, Japan has begun a high-tech crackdown on digital piracy by racking up their first arrest for P2P downloading using a new tracking system that allows them to detect when people are illegally accessing copyrighted material.

Before you start scrubbing your hard drive in a panic, however, it appears that Japanese authorities are starting their campaign by targeting the worst offenders -- in this case, a 62-year-old fan of 'Percy Jackson and the Lightning Thief' and 'Avatar' who didn't stop at downloading the two films but compounded his crime by uploading them for others to view.

And while the two blockbusters were the most high-profile instances, thanks in part to the fact that both movies are still in theaters in Japan, they were just the tip of the iceberg for the Shizouka native: Cops estimate that he has uploaded over 500 films during the past four years using peer-to-peer file sharing platforms.

Needless to say, the news was hailed as a victory for mankind by Hollywood, but how much the arrest of one Japanese grandpa will affect worldwide piracy remains to be seen. We wouldn't put it past Japan to turn their detection technology into an international fad, though.

After all, nobody thought Pokémon would catch on, either.