It's back to Argentina on Day 9 (well I said it was one of my favourite film producing nations, so I couldn't leave it at Twisted Romance which, thanks to the fact I keep saying how awful it is, may be culminating cult status).

In Plan B Bruno is dumped by his girlfriend; behind a calm, indifferent expression, his mind plans a cold, sweet vengeance. As this is modern, liberal Argentina, she keeps seeing Bruno once in a while, but also has a new boyfriend, Pablo. Bruno becomes Pablo's friend, with the idea of eroding the couple. Bruno soon realises the best way to do this may be to steal Pablo away himself. The balance of power is ever shifting between the two boys as secrets are revealed, and previously unthought of emotions surface.

More LLGFF day 9 stuff after the jump... It's back to Argentina on Day 9 (well I said it was one of my favourite film producing nations, so I couldn't leave it at Twisted Romance which, thanks to the fact I keep saying how awful it is, may be culminating cult status).

In Plan B Bruno is dumped by his girlfriend; behind a calm, indifferent expression, his mind plans a cold, sweet vengeance. As this is modern, liberal Argentina, she keeps seeing Bruno once in a while, but also has a new boyfriend, Pablo. Bruno becomes Pablo's friend, with the idea of eroding the couple. Bruno soon realises the best way to do this may be to steal Pablo away himself. The balance of power is ever shifting between the two boys as secrets are revealed, and previously unthought of emotions surface.

With such a twisting plot it could easily have been a farce, and it is certainly funny. But the skill with which director Marco Berger weaves layers of discovery lend more of a feeling of gradual realisation, rather then sudden reveal. it is this same sense which turns an initial romantic comedy into a truly original drama. The actors are given plenty of time to develop their characters, and as a result features some of the best close-up, extended shot acting I've seen for a long time.

The Lesbian and Gay festival embraces the whole gamut of queerdom, which includes trans, allies and something that Plan B exemplifies perfectly - questioning. if there is a message to this film, it's that we shouldn't be scared to explore our emotions, wherever they may take us. One of the characters says - "Whatever you do, does not change what will be". Nice.

Plan B is, thus far, my favourite film at this year's LLGFF, so I thought I'd contrast it with this short piece:

Uncle David, is an experimental British film from David Hoyle, described as a low budget (well, yes) black comedy (not sure about that). Queer performance artist Hoyle is joined by porn star Ashley Ryder, in a semi-improvised film, set in the bleak environs of the Isle of Sheppey. They appear to be an Uncle and Nephew who are involved in an incestuous relationship, and are plotting for the younger of the two to kill themselves. But to be honest Ryder is so unintelligible that what really is happening is anybody's guess.

I'm not sure Hoyle, who introduced the premiere, cares much, so long as people watch it and go - "oh wasn't that weird/controversial/nauseous", which I'm sure the fleet of Royal Vauxhall Tavern attendees were happy to do. Personally I found it more dull and poorly made than your average student film. (Oh and there's no picture for this one because it was just Ryder in the squeaky, and you're all too innocent for that).