There's lots of sex and cheating in Atom Egoyan's new erotic thriller 'Chloe,' but as far as a good story is concerned, well, most critics just don't think so.

Julianne Moore plays Catherine, a Toronto professional who suspects her husband David (Liam Neeson) is being unfaithful. Catherine hires a female escort named Chloe (Amanda Seyfried) to confirm her suspicions, and from that point on it seems everyone winds up in the sack. At least that's how most critics feel, who in several reviews compared 'Chloe' to late-night cable fare.

Read what the critics have to say after the jump. There's lots of sex and cheating in Atom Egoyan's new erotic thriller 'Chloe,' but as far as a good story is concerned, well, most critics just don't think so.

Julianne Moore plays Catherine, a Toronto professional who suspects her husband David (Liam Neeson) is being unfaithful. Catherine hires a female escort named Chloe (Amanda Seyfried) to confirm her suspicions, and from that point on it seems everyone winds up in the sack. At least that's how most critics feel, who in several reviews compared 'Chloe' to late-night cable fare.

'Chloe' is the latest from Canadian helmer Egoyan, whose previous works include 'The Sweet Hereafter' and 'Ararat.' It's based on Anne Fontaine's 2003 French film 'Nathalie,' which starred Fanny Ardant and Gérard Depardieu.

Neeson, incidentally, was shooting 'Chloe' in Toronto when his wife Natasha Richardson suffered a fatal skiing accident in Montreal last March.

Here are the reviews:

Variety: "Simply stated, when Catherine starts losing control, so does the film. The sexual deceptions, experiments, lies and revelations from this point on are polymorphously perverse, as they used to say, but decreasingly credible, leading to a denouement both ludicrous from a dramatic p.o.v. and far too punitive morally for the most transgressive of the central figures."

The New Yorker: "Even the throbbing score, by Mychael Danna, sounds unwittingly risible, and there were times -- I refer you to David's first, salivating gaze at Chloe across a coffee shop -- when I felt that we could be watching one of those soft-core cable dramas starring the redoubtable Shannon Tweed, with titles like 'Night Raptures IV' or 'Executive Sensations.'"

Associated Press: "The characters are so abnormal and their situation so contrived that it's impossible to sit back and enjoy the train wreck the way you can revel in Glenn Close murderously popping out of that bathtub one last time in 'Fatal Attraction.'"

'Chloe' trailer
Chicago Sun-Times: "Egoyan follows his material to an ultimate conclusion. Some will find it difficult to accept. Is it arbitrary? Most of life's conclusions are arbitrary. I am not sure this particular story should, or can, be wound up in a conventional manner."

Miami Herald: "Seyfried, all grown up (seriously) from 'Mamma Mia!,' does what she can with the role of the ethereal prostitute, hinting at potential malice -- even madness -- beneath her angelic face. But as the movie goes on, the character makes less and less sense, and Egoyan resorts to some cheap business involving an ornate hairpin that is, quite frankly, beneath him."

Entertainment Weekly: "When Egoyan makes a heavy-breather like 'Chloe,' he doesn't seem to realize that he's drawn to kink and taboo in the same routinely voyeuristic way that a maker of straight-to-cable trash is. Egoyan simply jettisons the usual thriller boilerplate (chase scenes, etc.) and then stretches out everything else with arty indulgence."

The Hollywood Reporter: "A sexually charged melodrama starring Julianne Moore as a distrustful wife who deliberately leads flirtatious husband Liam Neeson into temptation in order to confirm her suspicions, the cleverly constructed film manages the neat feat of containing all ingredients of a potential hit while remaining true to Egoyan's body of work."
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