Most people will know the story of the 1969 Stonewall riots, but in a world premiere from Kate Davis and David Heilbroner, a wealth of archive footage and eye-witness interviews provide a more detailed perspective.

The evocatively titled Stonewall Uprising shows a community at breaking point - gay men and women arrested for cross dressing, beaten and killed by police, tortured and lobotomised by doctors. Then on 28th June 1969, the police raided New York gay bar the Stonewall Inn, and as the entire population of the gay village fought back, the gay liberation movement was born.

Find out more about the film and other LLGFF day 6 highlights after the jump... Most people will know the story of the 1969 Stonewall riots, but in a world premiere from Kate Davis and David Heilbroner, a wealth of archive footage and eye-witness interviews provide a more detailed perspective.

The evocatively titled Stonewall Uprising shows a community at breaking point - gay men and women arrested for cross dressing, beaten and killed by police, tortured and lobotomised by doctors. Then on 28th June 1969, the police raided New York gay bar the Stonewall Inn, and as the entire population of the gay village fought back, the gay liberation movement was born.

This film achieves more than placing the historical context of one pivotal moment. Interviews from witnesses as diverse as a drag queen, a street kid, a journalist and the policeman who led the raid create a much more complex and emotive story than is often told today.

Horrific archive footage of medical experiments such as shock therapy are juxtaposed with witty interviews from local gay men and women who remember the thrill of revolution. But just as a man can recall the camp image of a chorus line of drag queens kicking their way towards the police Roquette-style, tears roll down his face as he realises what they were fighting against.

The directors have created a film that will surely be used in queer studies forever, and in all conscience should be screened on mainstream TV. I laughed, I cried, I loved it.

The LLGFF is also a chance to catch up with the biggest gay films of the year like A Single Man. This often prompts criticism from the hardcore movie-goer, but I think it's a great idea for people who want to come and enjoy the sociability of the festival (and there's a lot of it), but aren't sure they'd like alternative cinema. There is also a difference watching a film like this in a predominantly gay setting as it tends to provoke a stronger mass response.

One such film which was certainly overshadowed by A Single Man, is Ang Lee's Taking Woodstock. Comedian Demetri Martin is superb as interior designer Elliot Tiber, returned from Greenwich village to the Catskills to help run his parents dilapidated motel. When Elliot hears that a neighbouring village has revoked its license for a 'hippy' music festival, he contacts the organisers and offers his motel, and a local farmers land to make Woodstock happen. You know the rest.

But actually the film shows little of the musical highlights, and surrounding historical events such as the moon landing are confined to passing TV reports. It's a much more personal story about a young man seeking acceptance from his parents, and longing for his own freedom away from his hometown.

It's billed as a light and entertaining film, which is not untrue, comic moments come aplenty from Staunton's formidable matriarch and Dan Fogler's theatre troupe leader, who strip off at every opportunity. But this also belies an unexpected emotional depth that's only fleetingly glimpsed, thanks to Martin's restrained performance - an achievement for someone is new to acting from the stand-up comedy scene.

Contrasts between the cliche of late sixties liberalism, and the realities of prejudicial hangover are perfectly exemplified by Elliot's mostly hidden homosexuality, while straight couples cavort naked around his land.

Ang Lee has a great skill, not just in lush cinematography, or organising hundreds of extras in a field, but in finding these fragile moments that enrich a simpler story. In this sense, it's not a million miles from Lee's Brokeback Mountain. The word 'beautiful' is often repeated in TW, and it sums it up...beautifully.