By the time you read this most of the tickets to the 24th London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival will probably have been sold - it just gets busier every year - so start booking!

"BUT WHAT SHOULD I SEE?" you ask. Alright, don't shout. I'll get to that. But first a word on what was surely the talk of the press launch. The poster. I love it. Escaped gay zoo animals on a purple routemaster headed out to watch a film - genius. As was the accompanying cake from Konditor and Cook which you can see below.

OK, so the film festival isn't just about desserts, I'll go on...


By the time you read this most of the tickets to the 24th London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival will probably have been sold - it just gets busier every year - so start booking!

"BUT WHAT SHOULD I SEE?" you ask. Alright, don't shout. I'll get to that. But first a word on what was surely the talk of the press launch. The poster. I love it. Escaped gay zoo animals on a purple routemaster headed out to watch a film - genius. As was the accompanying cake from Konditor and Cook which you can see below.

OK, so the film festival isn't just about desserts, I'll go on.

It looks to be a good year for the lesbians, with the opening night film, a world premiere of The Secret Diaries of Miss Anne Lister. The BBC drama features Maxine Peake playing the 19th century lesbian pioneer. And if you were lucky enough to attend that then the opening night celebrations continued at Jewel Bar in Piccadilly Circus.

There will also be a centrepiece screening of Topp Twins: Untouchable Girls, about twin lesbian folk singers - the trailer made it look as odd and funny as it sounds.

The closing night gala goes to the men, with a screening of Children of God, a love story fighting homophobia in the Bahamas, which seems like it will be gorgeously photographed.

There's a few award winners in there, including Brotherhood, a tale of gays in the Neo-Nazi movement, and Ander, a portrayal of gay rural life in Basque country.

With all the troubles in Uganda coming to light, expect a good turnout for the collection of short films LGBT Africa.

The Curzon midnight movies always have a good atmosphere. This year will be a double bill tribute to Warhol luminary Candy Darling.

Saturday 27th March will be Dusty Springfield day, as a collection of rare TV appearance are gathered into one feature, and DJ's will be playing classic Dusty tunes in the Benugo bar. If you've been to the festival before you'll know that the bars stay open late and basically become a tasteful gay club. I recommend the chip butties and Belgian beer.

Check out American in Bute Town: Dee Rees at Iris, which gives us a look at the new short from the Iris Prize winning filmmaker. I met her a couple of years back, and her work is excellent.

If you missed the big films of the year, A Single Man, and Taking Woodstock, both well worth a watch, then there's another chance to see them in the festival - I find that sometimes it makes a difference watching with a predominantly gay crowd.

Stick two fingers up at the homophobic Australian Winter Olympics commentators and go see the documentary Pop Star On Ice, about the flamboyant figure skater Jonny Weir.

My totally left field recommendation is for an epic movie I saw at last year's Torino festival Raging Sun, Raging Sky. This won the Teddy at the Berlin film festival in 2009, so about time it came to London. It's an hallucinogenic, sexy and poetic journey following Keiri, searching for his abducted lover Ryo. It recalls ancient myths, vengeful Gods and the power of nature. At over three hours it's not an easy watch, but after the first hour your brain switches into a different rhythm and you may well experience something beautiful.

And if you simply can't decide, then just pick a collection of short films, it's always a good entry into queer cinema and there's bound to be at least one or two gems hidden away.