Twenty-eight years have passed since Jeff Bridges' character Flynn found himself downloaded into the game grid by the evil, monolithic MCP in the original 'Tron.' But countless roles, dozens of projects and an Oscar later, the actor says that as much has stayed the same as has changed during the intervening years between that film and its forthcoming follow-up, 'Tron: Legacy.'

"It seems like we had a long weekend, basically," Bridges said from the film's Vancouver set last summer. "[Steven] Lisberger directed the first one, and he's very involved in this one, which is great -- having the source of the material still engaged in it ... And then it was basically the same reason that I did the first one; the first one was cutting edge technology at that time, and this one certainly is for this time. And it's a whole different way of making movies I hadn't experienced."

Twenty-eight years have passed since Jeff Bridges' character Flynn found himself downloaded into the game grid by the evil, monolithic MCP in the original 'Tron.' But countless roles, dozens of projects and an Oscar later, the actor says that as much has stayed the same as has changed during the intervening years between that film and its forthcoming follow-up, 'Tron: Legacy.'

"It seems like we had a long weekend, basically," Bridges said from the film's Vancouver set last summer. "[Steven] Lisberger who directed the first one, and he's very involved in this one, which is great -- having the source of the material still engaged in it ... And then it was basically the same reason that I did the first one; the first one was cutting edge technology at that time, and this one certainly is for this time. And it's a whole different way of making movies I hadn't experienced."

Moviefone visited the set of 'Tron: Legacy' in late June 2009, where we took a tour of some of the sets and spoke to various members of the cast, including actors Garrett Hedlund, Olivia Wilde and, of course, Bridges, as well as crew members such as producer and 'Tron' creator Steven Lisberger. While it was obvious that Joe Kosinski and co. updated the technology used to bring Tron's world to life, the set design and imagery we saw in conceptual drawings and photos revealed a clear connection between the designs of the two films.

And although we didn't get to conduct a proper interview with them, our group was able to meet and speak briefly to the members of Daft Punk, who are composing the film's score -- which means, yes, we do know what the two typically-robot-clad musicians actually look like.

In terms of further connecting the mythologies of the two films, Bridges said he had a few ideas that didn't make it into the final script: "I was hoping that we would get that Sark [played by] David Warner back. I had this funny scenario that didn't fly that he was sort of my butler," the actor said with a laugh.

Meanwhile, Lisberger explained why he thought Joe Kosinski was such a good choice to take over 'Legacy.' "I'm not sure these are in the right priority, but after 30 years, I don't want to compete with myself," Lisberger said. "Other issues are, technically I am not on the level of Joe Kosinski. And third is that Joe has a network of people that he works with, with Shawn. If I brought my network in, it would be a little bit like one of those Clint Eastwood movies where all the old guys go to space."

Bridges seemed invigorated (for The Dude, anyway) about the prospect of shepherding this beloved film franchise into a new era, and, quite possibly, turning it over to a cast of younger actors to carry it even further. But even given his memories of shooting 'Tron' and his extensive experience over the last 40 years as an actor, he didn't presume to wax poetic if some of his co-stars sought advice or guidance: "You mean like, 'How do I throw this disc?'" he asked rhetorically. "No, I think we just used Frisbees in the old one. They're a little bit more sophisticated, you know. It was pretty funky back then."