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In the new rom-com 'She's Out of My League,' which opens Friday, Jay Baruchel plays an underachieving Regular Joe -- a "five," according to his friends -- who dates a "solid 10" (Alice Eve), much to the disbelief of the universe at large. While obviously another variation on the ever-popular "loser gets the hot girl" theme, at least the movie goes to great lengths to address the disparity, as reflected in its title.

That's not generally the case with the films listed below. While not all are riffs on the classic male loser/female hottie scenario, each one features a badly mismatched couple of one kind or another and expects us to happily go along with it.

We say: not so fast. Even in the fantasy world of Hollywood, some things are just a little too far-fetched. In the new rom-com 'She's Out of My League,' which opens Friday, Jay Baruchel plays an underachieving Regular Joe -- a "five," according to his friends -- who dates a "solid 10" (Alice Eve), much to the disbelief of the universe at large. While obviously another variation on the ever-popular "loser gets the hot girl" theme, at least the movie goes to great lengths to address the disparity, as reflected in its title.

That's not generally the case with the films listed below. While not all are riffs on the classic male loser/female hottie scenario, each one features a badly mismatched couple of one kind or another and expects us to happily go along with it.

We say: not so fast. Even in the fantasy world of Hollywood, some things are just a little too far-fetched:


Julia Robert, Nick Nolte in 'I Love Trouble'Julia Roberts and Nick Nolte in 'I Love Trouble' (1994)
This is oft-cited as a classic of mismatched coupledom and we can't disagree. A romantic "thriller" about a competing cub reporter and veteran journalist who risk their lives in pursuit of a Big Story, 'Trouble' is pretty silly to begin with. Add the inevitable scenes of the weathered Nolte and fresh-faced Roberts getting all romantic and it approaches absurdity.


Woody Allen, Helena Bonham Carter in 'Mighty Aphrodite'Woody Allen and Helena Bonham Carter/Mira Sorvino in 'Mighty Aphrodite' (1995)
Yep, Woody's a repeat offender in this department, with his long list of leading ladies eons younger and infinitely more attractive than he. But there was something about his incongruous onscreen marriage with the 30-years-younger Bonham Carter, mainly known at that point for her adorably plucky 19th-century innocents, that really got our goat. In the same film, he gets it on with a ditsy young hooker (Sorvino, who won an Oscar), which adds considerably to the ick factor.


Kris Kristofferson, Barbara Streisand in 'A Star is Born'Barbara Streisand and Kris Kristofferson in 'A Star in Born' (1976)
This ill-conceived remake of the already twice-filmed classic has other problems besides the lack of chemistry between the overly slick Streisand and laid-back Kristofferson -- she's completely unbelievable as a struggling young rock singer, for starters -- but it sure didn't help. A killer voice is not enough to save an unconvincing premise.


Jennifer Lopez, Ralph Fiennes in 'Maid in Manhattan'Ralph Fiennes and Jennifer Lopez in 'Maid in Manhattan' (2002)
Whatever possessed one of the most subtle, intense actors in filmdom to star opposite "Jenny from the Block" in such a bland rom-com? Yes, his smooth Republican senator and her earnest hotel maid are supposed to be from wildly different worlds, but does their romance convince us that they belong together or at least have serious hots for each other? Nope!


Halle Berry, Warren Beatty in 'Bulworth'Warren Beatty and Halle Berry in 'Bulworth' (1998)
It's hard to say which was worse: director/screenwriter Beatty's attempt to make his politician character shocking and relevant by rapping his speeches and wearing hip-hop attire or his contrived romance with a young woman from South Central L.A., but they were both pretty darn embarrassing.


Evan Rachel Wood, Larry David in 'Whatever Works'Larry David and Evan Rachel Wood in 'Whatever Works' (2009)
Yes, this extreme May-December romance between a dim but sexy runaway and a crotchety geezer is played for laughs in Woody Allen's (who else?) most recent film, starring David as Allen's equally decrepit alter-ego. But it's still mighty hard to swallow Wood's character's infatuation with said geezer, no matter how unsophisticated she's supposed to be.


Mira Sorvino, Robin Williams in 'The Final Cut'Robin Williams and Mira Sorvino in 'The Final Cut' (2004)
There are a lot of intriguing ideas embedded in this sci-fi fantasy about a memory editor who customizes people's recollections, but Sorvino as Williams' love interest is not one of them. True, Sorvino hadn't had a hit movie in years, but that doesn't mean we want to see her in a romantic embrace with Patch Adams. (Perhaps sensing this, the filmmakers mercifully gave their relationship little screen time.) Still, nowhere as unsettling as her love scenes with Woody Allen (see above).


Heigl and Rogen in 'Knocked Up'Seth Rogen and Katherine Heigl in 'Knocked Up' (2007)
These two have become the poster children for mismatched couples, and with good reason. A lovely entertainment journalist who gets pregnant by a shlubby but decent slacker (Rogen) after a drunken one-night stand, Heigl's character would never keep the baby and the slacker in real life. But this is a comedy (and a fantasy), so the duo wind up together. Sure.


James Woods and Dolly Parton in 'Straight Talk'James Woods and Dolly Parton in 'Straight Talk' (1992)
Only in some surreal Charlie Kaufmanesque universe would these two make sense as a couple. Unfortunately, this flimsy rom-com -- about a sassy Southern lass turned popular radio DJ and the suspicious journalist who investigates and falls for her -- is not trying to be bizarre. Granted, it's hard to pair the incomparable Dolly with any mere mortal, but the wry Woods is totally out of his element here.


Roger and Jessica Rabbit in 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit?'Roger and Jessica Rabbit in 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' (1988)
"He makes me laugh," cooed the curvaceous cartoon siren Jessica (voiced by Kathleen Turner) about her goofy, fun-loving husband Roger. We all know how attractive a sense of humor is, but the huge disparity between the two Toons, both physically and personality-wise, defied logic. Even in a movie where animated characters and humans have conversations.