As you all know by now, 'The Hurt Locker' won the Oscar for Best Picture at the 82nd Annual Academy Awards. But after Tom Hanks opened the envelope and announced the biggest prize of the night, one producer was noticeably absent from the podium. That's because Nicolas Chartier was disinvited from the Academy Awards ceremony after he had sent an e-mail asking for 'Hurt Locker' votes and disparaging another film.

But when the Academy hands you lemons, you make lemonade, and the producer celebrated the year's best picture win with his own independent Oscar fete at the beach Sunday night. As you all know by now, 'The Hurt Locker' won the Oscar for Best Picture at the 82nd Annual Academy Awards. But after Tom Hanks opened the envelope and announced the biggest prize of the night, one producer was noticeably absent from the podium. That's because Nicolas Chartier was disinvited from the Academy Awards ceremony after he had sent an e-mail asking for 'Hurt Locker' votes and disparaging another film.

But when the Academy hands you lemons, you make lemonade, and the producer celebrated the year's best picture win with his own independent Oscar fete at the beach Sunday night.

A reporter at indieWIRE was on hand to document Chartier's Oscar experience. After he was bumped from the ceremony, the producer and financier took William Morris Endeavor's Graham Taylor and producer Lynette Howard up on their offer to watch the telecast from their living room in Venice. When news of the screening spread and the guest list swelled into the hundreds, the party was moved to reality TV producer Mike Fleiss' home in Malibu. A tent was set up, complete with red carpet and a poster of Chartier smacked with the word "BANNED." French flags adorned the tent, and a lifesize Oscar statuette sported a beret, in honor of Chartier's native country.

When 'The Hurt Locker' was named as the Best Picture, the tent erupted in rowdy, supportive applause. And after watching the Oscar winners take a turn at the microphone with their own acceptance speeches, Chartier ascended a footstool and made one of his own. Armed with a desk-size statuette, the Oscar-winning producer pulled out a written speech and, unrestricted by time and the hurry-up baton of an orchestra conductor, proceeded to thank a litany of folks, ending with "It's about the movies. This is what what we live for: to tell stories, to make people laugh and cry, to entertain and sometimes to make art."

The film, which starred Jeremy Renner, was the night's big winner, taking home six awards, including accolades for Best Picture, Mark Boal's Best Original Screenplay and Kathryn Bigelow as Best Director.