The latest adaptation of the Lewis Carroll classic 'Alice in Wonderland' -- as seen through the eyes of singular director Tim Burton -- had all the makings of a fantastical treat. An amalgamation of both Carroll's 'Alice In Wonderland' and 'Through the Looking Glass,' Burton's vision follows a 19-year-old Alice (Australian Mia Wasikowska from 'In Treatment') as she heads back to Wonderland -- or as it's known in this movie, Underland -- to escape the clutches of an unwanted marriage proposal.

The movie boasts eye-popping visuals, 3D effects and a stellar supporting cast, which includes chameleon and frequent Burton collaborator Johnny Depp as a crazy-eyed Mad Hatter, Helena Bonham Carter as the big-headed Red Queen, Stephen Fry as the Cheshire Cat, Crispin Glover as the Knave of Hearts, Alan Rickman as the Caterpillar and Anne Hathaway as the White Queen.

Curiously, not all the critics were charmed by Burton's big-studio take or its 3D milieu. Check out the reviews and then let us know what you think. The latest adaptation of the Lewis Carroll classic 'Alice in Wonderland' -- as seen through the eyes of singular director Tim Burton -- had all the makings of a fantastical treat. An amalgamation of both Carroll's 'Alice In Wonderland' and 'Through the Looking Glass,' Burton's vision follows a 19-year-old Alice (Australian Mia Wasikowska from 'In Treatment') as she heads back to Wonderland -- or as it's known in this movie, Underland -- to escape the clutches of an unwanted marriage proposal.

The movie boasts eye-popping visuals, 3D effects and a stellar supporting cast, which includes chameleon and frequent Burton collaborator Johnny Depp as a crazy-eyed Mad Hatter, Helena Bonham Carter as the big-headed Red Queen, Stephen Fry as the Cheshire Cat, Crispin Glover as the Knave of Hearts, Alan Rickman as the Caterpillar and Anne Hathaway as the White Queen.

Curiously, not all the critics were charmed by Burton's big-studio take or its 3D milieu. Check out the reviews and then let us know what you think.

Entertainment Weekly: "Burton's Disneyfied 3-D 'Alice in Wonderland,' written by the girl-power specialist Linda Woolverton ('Beauty and the Beast'), is a strange brew indeed: murky, diffuse, and meandering, set not in a Wonderland that pops with demented life but in a world called Underland that's like a joyless, bombed-out version of Wonderland. It looks like a CGI head trip gone postapocalyptic. In the film's rather humdrum 3-D, the place doesn't dazzle -- it droops."

Orlando Sentinel: "Purists will squeal, but it's a workable and watchable liberty to take with an oft-filmed yet impossible to film novel. ... And if it's not the Alice of your Disney childhood, enjoy the trip. Just remember, as Grace Slick sang, 'what the dormouse said. Feed your head. Feed your head.'"

The Hollywood Reporter: "A fantastical romp that proves every bit as transporting as that movie about the blue people of Pandora, his 'Alice' is more than just a gorgeous 3D sight to behold. ... Burton has delivered a subversively witty, brilliantly cast, whimsically appointed dazzler that also manages to hit all the emotionally satisfying marks."

'Alice in Wonderland' Trailer


The Arizona Republic: "Carroll purists and freshman English majors may be aghast at the change in story, but for those who watched 'Avatar' and marveled at the images but were left wanting by the wooden acting and tired story, 'Alice' is a treat."

Time Out New York: "For this loose amalga-daptation of both 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' and 'Through the Looking Glass,' Burton is in dispassionate, for-hire mode, which means he's more concerned with computer-generated eyesores than with the character, Alice Kingsley."

Chicago Tribune: "The movie won't be for everyone -- it's a little rough for preteens, and it doesn't throw many laughs the audience's way -- but along with 'Sweeney Todd,' this is Burton's most interesting project in a decade. ... It's best approached as corporate undertaking, undertaken successfully."

New York Magazine: "Tim Burton's new Disney movie is not Lewis Carroll's masterpiece of dream illogic, 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland,' but more of a C. S. Lewis Carroll 'Alice in Narnia' with your horror host Johnny Depp ... If you can get past the craven concessions to formula, though, it's rather underful-I mean, wonderful."
CATEGORIES Reviews