CATEGORIES Movies
For an entire generation of Americans, the concept of extraterrestrial life is embodied not by little green men or giant blue avatars but by something far more sinister and terrifying: a relentless, unending slow shuffle of bleeping and blooping pixels. And now that nightmare scenario is one step closer to becoming a big screen reality.

Yes, according to the Los Angeles Times, Warner Bros. is in negotiations with Japanese video game giant Taito to acquire the film rights to its 1978 classic 'Space Invaders.' The game, which became an instant hit when it debuted and went on to even greater popularity on the ubiquitous Atari 2600 console, helped create the video game craze in the United States. For an entire generation of Americans, the concept of extraterrestrial life is embodied not by little green men or giant blue avatars but by something far more sinister and terrifying: a relentless, unending slow shuffle of bleeping and blooping pixels. And now that nightmare scenario is one step closer to becoming a big screen reality.

Yes, according to the Los Angeles Times, Warner Bros. is in negotiations with Japanese video game giant Taito to acquire the film rights to its 1978 classic 'Space Invaders.' The game, which became an instant hit when it debuted and went on to even greater popularity on the ubiquitous Atari 2600 console, helped create the video game craze in the United States.

Of course, just what the film will actually be about is still up in the air; while the basic concept seems set -- we're guessing something to do with invaders from space -- the actual game consists of nothing but rows of taciturn alien vessels grimly descending form the sky while you shoot at them from behind tiny digital bunkers. In other words, there's no actual story there, meaning that Warner Bros. is essentially negotiating for the rights to use the famous 'Space Invaders' name in conjunction with whatever alien attack film they feel like putting together.

This deal, however, is certainly not unique, as it represents a growing trend among Hollywood studios looking to market to a generation of video game lovers now old enough to put their wallet where their nostalgia is. In addition to 'Space Invaders,' other old school games that are short on backstory but long on cultural impact include 'Missile Command' (currently being pursued by Fox) and 'Asteroids' (in development at Universal).

Personally, we're all for this trend, as we've long desired a 3D IMAX blockbuster version of 'Burger Time' or 'Mr. Do's Castle.' We're not quite as sure about Warner Bros. proposed team 'Space Invaders' though, which is no slight to producers Mark Gordon ('Saving Private Ryan') and Jason Blum ('Paranormal Activity'); we simply think this might be a job better suited for, say, James Cameron.

Because, after all, if there's one thing he's proven with 'Avatar,' it's that he doesn't need an Oscar-winning story to take aliens to the top of the box office charts.