'The Year's Work in Lebowski Studies,' a recent collection of essays by academics analyzing The Dude's impact on society, uses 'The Big Lebowski' to explore topics like slackerdom, surrealism and bowling, as well as the film's impact on American film culture.

The book's release begs the question: What other movies are worth some academic scrutiny? With that in mind, I've compiled a list of films I certainly wouldn't mind seeing pop up on the curriculum.

'The Year's Work in Lebowski Studies,' a recent collection of essays by academics analyzing The Dude's impact on society, uses 'The Big Lebowski' to explore topics like slackerdom, surrealism and bowling, as well as the film's impact on American film culture.

The book's release begs the question: What other movies are worth some academic scrutiny? With that in mind, I've compiled a list of films I certainly wouldn't mind seeing pop up on the curriculum.

'Bon Cop, Bad Cop'

Canadian Studies 201: French/ English Relations in Canada

Francophone detective Bouchard and Anglo detective Ward get off to a rocky start. Both have preconceived prejudices against each other, based solely on their cultural differences. The cantankerous cops personify the long-standing tension between French and English Canadians. Why can't we all just get along?

'Wayne's World'
Family Studies 301: Children Moving Out Later in Life

Wayne and Garth are in no hurry to grow up, and they're certainly not alone. Generation X and Y'ers are moving out on their own much later than their Boomer parents did. The film makes you ask: How are Boomers impacted financially by their late-blooming children, and how does the younger generation's delayed entry into the work force impact the economy on a broader level?

'Harold & Kumar Escape from Guantanamo Bay'
Political Science 101: Air Travel Experiences for Visible Minorities in a Post-9/11 Environment

While Kumar was definitely in the wrong when he snuck a bong onto an international flight and proceeded to light it on board, did he really deserve to be shipped off to Guantanamo Bay? In all likelihood, a white passenger would not have received such harsh treatment. While the film is clearly fiction and a tad far-fetched, it does serves as a jumping-off point to discuss the broader issue of how visible minorities have been impacted by increased paranoia and suspicion in a post-9/11 world.

'Pretty in Pink'
Sociology 201: How Class Differences Impact Relationships

We all like to pretend class isn't an issue anymore, but clearly it is. Sure, the movie is from the '80s, but things haven't changed that much. If a girl like Andie from the "wrong side of the tracks" went for a rich guy like Blane today, she would likely face some snobbery from his upper-crust friends, much like she does in this movie. The film serves as a great reference point to discuss power in personal relationships, and how that power is impacted by differences in socio-economic status.

'Juno'
Family Studies 101: Shifting Perspectives on Teenage Pregnancies

The plight of pregnant teenager Juno in a mainstream movie set many tongues a wagging (particularly those in America's growing abstinence-only movement). While the film's dialogue is a bit much at times, the concept of everyone remaining calm during a teenage pregnancy and handling the situation in a mature way is surprisingly refreshing. It provides a nice segue into the topic of shifting perspectives on teenage pregnancies: Girls are no longer shipped away to save the family from being publicly shamed.

Want to weigh in, too? Use the comments box to share your thoughts on movies you think warrant some academic attention.