Last time we heard anything about Paranormal Activity 2, it was the shocking news that filmmaker Kevin Greutert wouldn't be directing. Lionsgate and the Saw team worked their legal magic and not only pulled Greutert from the project, but basically forced him to take over Saw VII.

Since then, PA2 has been in the lurch. Parmaount needs to find a director (and soon) if they hope to have the film ready for the planned Halloween 2010 release date, but news on the search has been essentially nonexistent--until today. The LA Times takes a crack at figuring out who might land the gig of directing the sequel to one of the surprising box office success stories of all-time--and some of the names on the shortlist are shocking.

The most bizarre is easily Brian De Palma. Yes, the man who brought us Scarface, Carrie, and The Untouchables is reportedly being considered for Paranormal Activity 2. It's an odd choice, to say the least. De Palma makes big films with lengthy shoots and large budgets--which seems the antithesis of what Paramount would want for this project. I'm mixed on the director's body of work--and I can't see anything good coming out of a De Palma directed sequel to Oren Peli's original. It's too radical a departure from the first film for me.

Things get weirder when the Times uncovers the story that Akiva Goldsman was considered as well. Goldsman is a writer (he won an Oscar for A Beautiful Mind) who's never directed a feature length film. According to the piece, Goldsman will not be directing PA2--but that he was even in the running should terrify anyone who loves horror.

Jump past the break for two more potential directors.

Two other, more genre-friendly names turn up as well. Brad Anderson (director of the brilliant Session 9) and Greg McLean (who brought us Wolf Creek) are also reportedly in the mix. I'd vote for either of these filmmakers over De Palma--Anderson's Session 9 is one of the few legitimately creepy horror films to emerge in years, and McLean has demonstrated a knack for making compelling genre films.

What do you think? Can you see a De Palma directed Paranormal Activity 2 as a good thing, or is this another example of Hollywood executives being completely clueless when it comes to genre cinema?