We've watched the 'Watchmen.'

Now, it's time for audiences to travel with the Travelers.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, 'Watchmen' scribe Alex Tse has been called upon for another major adaptation after Fox landed the rights to The Fourth Realm Trilogy, a sci-fi book series penned by reclusive author John Twelve Hawks.

The series captures the current zeitgeist of the Western world and centers around a not-so-futuristic U.S. society where a secret organization seeks to control the populace through constant observation. Sound familiar, 'Big Brother' fans? We've watched the 'Watchmen.'

Now, it's time for audiences to travel with the Travelers.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, 'Watchmen' scribe Alex Tse has been called upon for another major adaptation after Fox landed the rights to The Fourth Realm Trilogy, a sci-fi book series penned by reclusive author John Twelve Hawks.

The series captures the current zeitgeist of the Western world and centers around a not-so-futuristic U.S. society, in which a secret organization seeks to control the populace through constant observation. Sound familiar, 'Big Brother' fans?

As with every sci-fi story, the books also feature a scrappy band of rebels who fight to bring down their evil oppressors. Rather than relying on the Force or the wisdom of Hans Zarkov, however, Hawks' heroes are an part of almost-extinct group called Travelers, who have the ability to project their spirit into other dimensions, and the warriors who protect them, known as Harlequins.

The first book, titled 'The Traveler,' involves a reluctant Harlequin, Mya, who is responsible for protecting two naive (and, we're guessing, trouble-prone) Traveler brothers.

Adding to the intrigue is the strange case of art imitating life that surrounds the author of the novels. According to the publisher, Random House, John Twelve Hawks (a pseudonym) lives "off the grid," communicating only via a voice scrambler and untraceable satellite phone, and neither his editor nor agent have actually met him. Whether this reclusive paranoia adds to the realism of the books is debatable, but it will doubtless be great for the publicity of the films.

The bestselling series has drawn comparisons to 'Star Wars,' 'The Matrix' and the works of Dan Brown, which should bode well at the box office if Tse can capture the same energy of those movies, but it's a tricky tightrope to walk. Everything from 'V for Vendetta' to 'Children of Men' has explored dystopian themes of public surveillance and oppression from government factions with varying success, and the screenwriter obviously had difficulties paring down the epic graphic novel 'Watchmen' into an easily digestable movie.

Will he have more luck with The Fourth Realm Trilogy? We'll be watching to find out.
CATEGORIES Movies