CATEGORIES Movies
With his numerous homages and references to the classic films of the past, fans of Quentin Tarantino have long viewed him as a savior of cinema. Now he's earning the title in a very literal fashion.

That's because, as reported in the Hollywood Reporter, Tarantino has intervened in a real estate dispute between the beloved Los Angeles institution New Beverly Cinema and their landlord, rescuing the theater from imminent eviction by purchasing the building himself in order to ensure that fans of cinema will continue to have a venue to view classic movies on the big screen.

"It was going to be turned into a Super Cuts," Tarantino said. "I'd been coming to the New Beverly ever since I was old enough to drive there from the South Bay -- since about 1982. So, I couldn't let that happen." With his numerous homages and references to classic films of the past, fans of Quentin Tarantino have long viewed him as a savior of cinema. Now he's earning the title in a very literal fashion.

That's because, as reported in the Hollywood Reporter, Tarantino has intervened in a real estate dispute between the beloved Los Angeles institution New Beverly Cinema and their landlord, rescuing the theater from imminent eviction by purchasing the building himself in order to ensure that fans of cinema will continue to have a venue to view classic movies on the big screen.

"It was going to be turned into a Super Cuts," Tarantino said. "I'd been coming to the New Beverly ever since I was old enough to drive there from the South Bay -- since about 1982. So, I couldn't let that happen."

While some cynics may attribute the move to the follically challenged Tarantino's antipathy for stylish hairdos, the indie auteur, who is up for multiple Oscars this year for 'Inglorious Basterds,' has long been a champion of classic films, a fact exemplified most recently by his feature-length industry homage 'Grindhouse.' So when he initially learned of the theater's financial difficulty some years ago from New Beverly owner Sherman Togran, he stepped in behind the scenes to keep the theater afloat.

"Since I'm a print collector and I screen movies at my home, I heard from other collectors and projectionists that Sherman might have to close down," Tarantino told the Hollywood Reporter. Discovering that Togran needed $5,000 per month to stay in business, Tarantino put his money where his mouth was, paying the money out of pocket, a gesture the director simply calls "a contribution to cinema."

When Togran unexpectedly died, however, even that contribution wasn't enough to prevent the landlord from immediately seeking a new, more lucrative tenant. Only one roadblock stood in his path: Tarantino, who, backed by a clause in Togran's lease that allowed the family right of first refusal if they could find a buyer for the building, intervened to save the theater by buying it outright.

"I always considered the New Beverly my charity -- an investment I never wanted back. I already had a good relationship with the family and the theater, so it was a natural step," said Tarantino who, as owner, occasionally invokes his privilege to screen movies of his own choice. "I can make programming suggestions when I want to. It is cool to have a theater that I can use to show what I like.

"As long as I'm alive," he added, "and as long as I'm rich, the New Beverly will be there, showing double features in 35mm."

And for that, film fans give a hearty amen.