Have you ever noticed that Leonardo DiCaprio freaks out all over the place in almost every movie he's in? Think about it -- he either completely loses his temper or completely loses his mind in every movie. And sometimes both.

'Shutter Island' is no different, as the whole plot revolves around Leo going crazy, or at least thinking he's going crazy, which is pretty much the same thing.

Just see the trailer: Leo starts out calm and collected enough, throwing his weight around as a U.S. Marshall in charge of investigating the disappearance of a patient from an isolated mental asylum. It isn't long, though, before his eyes are bugging out and he's talking in seething whispers, running amok as the madness takes hold. Go Leo! Have you ever noticed that Leonardo DiCaprio freaks out all over the place in almost every movie he's in? Think about it -- he either completely loses his temper or his mind in every movie. Sometimes both.

'Shutter Island' is no different, as the whole plot revolves around Leo going crazy, or at least thinking he's going crazy, which is pretty much the same thing.

Just see the trailer: Leo starts out calm and collected enough, throwing his weight around as a U.S. Marshall in charge of investigating the disappearance of a patient from an isolated mental asylum. It isn't long, though, before his eyes are bugging out and he's talking in seething whispers, running amok as the madness takes hold. Go Leo!

To honor Mr. DiCaprio's latest emotional breakdown, we'll take a look at some of our very favorite Leo Freak-Outs.

'The Aviator' (2004)
Leo plays Howard Hughes in this biopic, his second collaboration with director Martin Scorsese. Hughes was something of a mad genius -- a seemingly tireless film producer, aviation mogul and lover of famous women. He also suffered from an extreme case of obsessive-compulsive disorder, a disease that reaches its peak in the sequence where Hughes locks himself in his screening room for an unknown number of days, staring at dailies of 'Hell's Angels,' growing out his fingernails and urinating in empty milk bottles -- all while naked as a jay bird.



'The Basketball Diaries' (1995)
Leo plays Jim Carroll, a high school basketball star turned street-hustling heroin addict in this harrowing portrait of addiction. Carroll experiences the meanest of the mean streets of New York as he steals and prostitutes himself to get his fix, a harsh and unforgiving life that provides plenty of opportunities for him to get beaten up and sometimes worse. As Carroll's life goes further down the toilet, the entire movie seems like one extended freak-out sequence.



'The Beach' (2000)
Danny Boyle's adaptation of Alex Garland's novel is much reviled, and deservedly so, but at least we're treated to one extended visual treat from the 'Trainspotting' director -- Video Game Leo! You see, when you live in the wilderness, cut off from society, you go crazy -- that's what 'Lord of the Flies' taught us, and there are no exceptions. Leo gets banished to "guard duty" near the end of the film, protecting the beloved beach from intruders, and the isolation promptly causes him to lose his mind. He soon imagines himself in a video game, scurrying through the lush foliage, restoring his health by eating leaves and roots and ... yeah. Anyway, that bit of wonder isn't online, so we've provided an alternate clip that will at least give you an idea of just how bonkers paradise can make you.



'Body of Lies' (2008)
Ridley Scott's timely thriller teaches us that being a CIA operative is the most stressful job in the universe. If you thought 'The Basketball Diaries' was one extended freak-out sequence, wait until you see this one -- Leo rarely has a scene where his brow isn't furrowed in anger, fear or concern. He spends most of the movie beating up people and throwing them down staircases, pausing only to yell at Russell Crowe on the phone every now and then. And that torture scene -- whoa nelly! You'd freak out too if someone took a hammer to your hand.



'Catch Me If You Can' (2002)
Being a professional con artist must certainly take its emotional toll sooner rather than later, having to keep up with all those lies and identities you've created for yourself. It gets to the point where Frank Abagnale, Jr. kind of wants to get caught, as illustrated by his bizarre behavior in a massive printing factory in France, where he is confronted by FBI Agent Carl Hanratty (Tom Hanks) on Christmas Eve after a years-long chase. It ends up being the point where Frank is finally arrested, spending seven years in a French prison before being released to Hanratty in the U.S.



'The Departed' (2006)
Another movie in which Leo seems completely stressed out for the entire running time, and deservedly so -- being an undercover cop in Frank Costello's Boston crime gang is almost as stressful a gig as being a CIA operative. Leo has lots of wonderful freak-out moments in this one, but we're especially fond of the scene where he attempts to make a reputation for himself to gain Costello's trust -- he smashes a glass against a guy's head in a bar after the dude makes fun of his cranberry and soda. Ray Winstone has to step in before things get really ugly -- and before he takes a few swings at the poor guy himself.



'Revolutionary Road' (2008)
Suburbia is hell -- it destroys your identity and dashes your hopes and dreams. That's the message in Sam Mendes' anti-valentine to post-war America, and Leo and his 'Titanic' co-star Kate Winslet slam the message home by spending most of the movie screaming, yelling and crying. The argument scenes are fierce and full of despair, and Leo's sudden bursts of violence are nothing short of shocking, especially at the end of the film, when his pain -- highlighted by Thomas Newman's soaring score -- is just too much for us to bear. All Leo had to do in 'Titanic' was freeze to death -- Mendes shows us that having a house with a white picket fence can be a fate much worse.



'William Shakespeare's Romeo + Juliet' (1996)
Baz Luhrmann had his actors scream much of their Shakespearean dialogue in his hyperactive adaptation of the Bard's tragedy, usually to the point that you had no idea what they were saying. However, there's no mistaking Romeo's classic cry to the heavens, cursing his fate and the circumstances that led to him killing Tybalt in cold-blooded vengeance for murdering Mercutio: "I AM FORTUNE'S FOOL!" Yes you are, Romeo, and the tempest-toss'd Florida weather drives the point home even further.


CATEGORIES Features, Video