With the resurgence of development on Universal's Kurt Cobain biopic, I'm back to pondering how many different ways such a film could go. Well, not this particular film, which is likely being confined to certain stipulations by executive producers Courtney Love and her lawyer, Howard Weitzman. But what if someone else, say Oliver Stone or Kurt & Courtney director Nick Broomfield, wanted to go in a more speculative, potentially anti-Courtney direction? Or, given that I'm Not There co-writer Oren Moverman is now set to helm the thing, I'm imagining something more experimental than Universal is really apt to go for. It all reminds me of the controversy of...

The Doors

Now, I'm a lover of Stone's movie, but many fans of the band disagree with its portrayal of Jim Morrison and the rest, as well as it's manipulation of facts and chronology. Actually, moreso than the fans, the surviving members of The Doors and others associated with Morrison still aren't too happy with the 1991 film based on their lives. Many years ago I directly asked Ray Manzarek to quit bitching and make his own damn Doors movie (well, not in those words). The keyboardist's response was that he's more interested in making some other film he'd scripted. The result of that was clearly 2000's Love Her Madly (based on a story by Morrison), which apparently wasn't worth the effort.

Of course, he might be working on a documentary. And now we're also about to finally get to see When You're Strange, a potentially comprehensive documentary from Tom DiCillo, narrated by Johnny Depp. In our review of the film from Sundance '09, Scott Weinberg said it's specifically for the fans, though it may not really tell them so much as show them anything they don't know. Still, if this appeases the people who hated The Doors, perhaps there's not reason for a remake of the dramatized version?

Honestly, I'd still be intrigued about a Doors movie that's more accurate, as long as it did it's own part to bring something cinematically to the band's history. Just as I've learned and felt different things about Cobain through the different perspectives of Kurt & Courtney and AJ Schnack's Kurt Cobain About a Son and Gus Van Sant's Last Days, I believe I could get the same benefit from multiple films about the Lizard King. And of course, as many movies that feature The Doors' music, the better, in my opinion.

Hey, if Truman Capote, Christopher Columbus and Wyatt Earp can get more than one biopic in a year's time, it's not that weird to think about a remake of The Doors after 20 years. Is it? And wouldn't it be fitting (though admittedly idiotic) if Dennis Quaid played Morrison now (think Doc Holiday).