As the cliché goes, it's an honor just to be nominated for an Oscar. Well, actually, it's more than just an honor. You also get a certificate. And a pear-Gorgonzola salad.

Monday was the annual Oscar nominees' luncheon at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, a chance for all this year's nominees to mingle and relax and pretend for a couple hours they're not secretly rooting for their rivals to lose. 121 nominees showed for the event yesterday and participated in such annual Oscar luncheon traditions as the class photo (the Los Angeles Times has a good 360-degree panoramic version of this) and the yearly plea from the telecast producers to keep those acceptance speeches under 45 seconds.

The luncheon also provided reporters in attendance with a steady stream of celebrity quotes from the nominees, as well as news from Oscar show producers Adam Shankman and Bill Mechanic about what changes to expect during this year's broadcast -- all of which you can read about below. As the cliché goes, it's an honor just to be nominated for an Oscar. Well, actually, it's more than just an honor. You also get a certificate. And a pear-Gorgonzola salad.

Monday was the annual Oscar nominees' luncheon at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, a chance for all this year's nominees to mingle and relax and pretend for a couple hours they're not secretly rooting for their rivals to lose. 121 nominees showed for the event yesterday and participated in such annual Oscar luncheon traditions as the class photo (the Los Angeles Times has a good 360-degree panoramic version of this) and the yearly plea from the telecast producers to keep those acceptance speeches under 45 seconds.

The luncheon also provided reporters in attendance with a steady stream of celebrity quotes from the nominees, as well as news from Oscar show producers Adam Shankman and Bill Mechanic about what changes to expect during this year's broadcast -- all of which you can read about below.

One tradition of the luncheon is the random seating, so that (according to multiple reports) 'The Hurt Locker' screenwriter Mark Boal dines alongside 'A Single Man' star Colin Firth, or so that Oscar royal Meryl Streep is seated somewhere in Siberia, or so that (as IndieWIRE's Anne Thompson reports) Polish documentarian Anna Wydra gets to meet Quentin Tarantino and tell him 'Pulp Fiction' inspired her to become a filmmaker.

One first this year: the Academy streamed the event live on its Facebook page. Some 1,000 to 1,200 fans watched it online as it happened, reports the New York Times. (You can still watch the whole thing, replayed, here.)

First-time Oscar show producers Shankman and Mechanic made the usual (and usually ignored) request to winners to keep their speeches free of laundry lists of thank-yous that viewers at home don't care about; as we reported earlier today, they'll be providing a backstage thank-you webcam for honorees who want to thank their agents and hairdressers without getting their speeches cut off by the orchestra.

The producers said they hoped winners would speak emotionally about what winning an Oscar means to them. To that end, according to the Hollywood Reporter, the Mar. 7 awards show will begin with a short film of past winners (including Renée Zellweger, Diablo Cody and 'An Inconvenient Truth' director Davis Guggenheim) discussing how their victories affected them personally.

Another change likely to shorten the show: Nominated songs will be represented in clips from their movies, not with live performances, according to the Reporter. So, despite Shankman's background in choreography, don't look for those embarrassingly tacky (or wonderfully tacky, depending on your point of view) song-and-dance numbers of years past.

The luncheon would seem to be a respite from the rivalries formed during the three months of awards shows, though Best Actress nominee Carey Mulligan told USA Today that she and competitor Gabourey Sidibe have become friends and are even trading fashion tips about what to wear on the big night. "Gabby and I have switched numbers and are texting each other about clothes and things," she said.

Much of what stars said at the luncheon (as quoted by USA Today, the Associated Press and the Los Angeles Times) seemed to have to do with how best to put the Oscar experience into perspective. As Woody Harrelson put it, regarding his slim chance of beating 'Inglourious Basterds'' Christoph Waltz for Best Supporting Actor, "I suppose there'd be jitters if I thought I was going to win. But seeing as how I'm certain that I won't, I'm just treating it the way I should, which is as a good party." Here are some of the best things overheard at the luncheon:

•Colin Firth: "I will be in a daze. I think that's quite a good place to be, actually. People pay good money for the kind of things that put you in a daze."

•Gabourey Sidibe: "I'm really excited that this show will be hosted by Jack Donaghy and The Jerk!"

James Cameron (spotting some of the acting nominees in the room): "It's always been my fantasy to work with Meryl, or with Clooney."

Jeremy Renner (on being honored for playing an Iraq War soldier in 'Hurt Locker'): "What I really take as the highest honor is when the service member says, 'I show it to my wife, or to my family, to explain kind of an idea of what it's like,' though obviously we took some liberties because it's cinema."

•Woody Harrelson (on how impressed he was by the servicemen he met while playing a soldier in 'The Messenger'): "As much as I love the warrior, I still loathe the war."

Lee Daniels (the black and openly gay director of 'Precious,' on being only the second African-American director ever nominated for an Oscar): "I didn't think it was a big deal. But then I got thousands of e-mails of young, not just African-American filmmakers, but gay filmmakers, Chinese filmmakers ... saying there's a chance."

Maggie Gyllenhaal (on advice from her brother Jake, nominated four years ago for 'Brokeback Mountain'): "He said, 'There isn't actually anything at the end of the rainbow.' He said, 'It's a lot of fun and enjoy it in that spirit. If you make it mean too much more than that, you'll probably go astray.'"