CATEGORIES Cinematical
It was bad enough for film criticism when we were dealing with scandals involving fake movie reviewers. Now real "critics" are doing great damage to the integrity of the field, particularly the online segment, as plagiarizing has become an increasing offense among writers. While it's not the same as completely fabricating articles (it may be considered worse), the issue is ripe for a remake of the 2003 film...

Shattered Glass

Of course, the title makes less sense if not about a person named Glass, but remakes can go with title changes. Perhaps Shattered Fischer? Shattered Rotella? These both refer to two individuals who've been dragged through the mud on blogs, Twitter and The Vancouver Sun recently. Paul Fischer, who apparently retired from journalism today in response to the scandal, was found to be lifting plot synopses for his reviews directly from press notes and film festival guides (he's also legendary for his dumb quotes, but that's now the least of his crimes). Lisa Rotella, on the other hand, claimed to be a columnist for radio network Westwood One and posted film reviews on her blog that were completely plagiarized from pieces from other blogs, newspapers and Hollywood trades. Interestingly, Fischer contributed to the site Dark Horizons (which has deleted his reviews there), and Rotella lied about writing for them.

Given the less cinematic form of journalism fraud exhibited by these writers, this remake might not be as enjoyable as the original Shattered Glass, which visualized the made up stories penned by Stephen Glass (Hayden Christensen). But films about journalism are a Hollywood tradition. And while movies involving web journalism and blogger characters aren't big moneymakers yet (Julie & Julia doesn't count; I mean stuff like State of Play), it's only a matter of time before the 2010s do for the blogosphere what the 1930s did for newspapers (anybody want to be the Capra of blog movies?). How about we start here? I'm not the only person who recognized that "this is our Shattered Glass." But who should play film criticism's Stephen Glass?