CATEGORIES Reviews
After a 6-year disappearing act from motion pictures, Mel Gibson is back.

Given the reviews so far, though, it might not be such a welcome return, as the critics are mostly split on his recent comeback (How many has he had?), the bad-ass, "take no names" thriller 'Edge of Darkness,' directed by 'Casino Royale' helmer Martin Campbell.

Adapted to the screen from Campbell's own 1985 BBC miniseries, 'Edge of Darkness' is about a widowed cop who sadly witnesses the murder of his daughter; Gibson sets off on an investigation into the killer's identity, exposing corruption and villainous agendas along the way.

Take a look at what the critics have to say: After a 6-year disappearing act from motion pictures, Mel Gibson is back.

Given the reviews so far, though, it might not be such a welcome return, as the critics are mostly split on his recent comeback (How many has he had?), the bad-ass, "take no names" thriller 'Edge of Darkness,' directed by 'Casino Royale' helmer Martin Campbell.

Adapted to the screen from Campbell's own 1985 BBC miniseries, 'Edge of Darkness' is about a widowed cop who sadly witnesses the murder of his daughter; Gibson sets off on an investigation into the killer's identity, exposing corruption and villainous agendas along the way.

Take a look at what the critics have to say:

Roger Ebert: "I explain this not merely to avoid discussing the off-the-shelf thriller plot, but to illustrate that 'Edge of Darkness,' like so many recent thrillers, has no ambition to be taken seriously. If the corporation were more realistic, the movie would be, too. And then the fate of the world wouldn't depend yet once again on One Cop ... With Nothing to Lose ... On a Personal Mission ... Gibson is a credible, attractive hero, as he has always been, so if you want fast-food action, here's your movie."

Entertainment Weekly: "'Edge of Darkness' has nervous whistle-blowers, sleazy politicians out to protect their puppeteers, and hitmen who drive an anonymous black van that might as well be marked ''The Hitmen's Anonymous Black Van.' ... What the film doesn't have is a political revelation we give a fig about. The more that 'Edge of Darkness' reveals about the Corruption of America, the less it seems like anything but a conspiracy-of-the-week excuse to get Mel Gibson hot under the collar. His slow-burn fury keeps the movie going, but not enough to invest us in any justice beyond payback."

Village Voice
: "Gibson has been absent from the American screen since 2004. He's squandered his industry clout with risks both planned ('The Passion of the Christ') and, assumedly, not (the passion for conspiracy theory). One wonders -- certainly Warner Bros. suits will -- if off-screen events have made it impossible for audiences to swallow him as a character. Yet Gibson still knows what he does best, as a star should, and creates tension just from never letting the tears poised in his eyes fall. Onscreen much of the time, thicker and more creased than you remember, he can make this rather unshapely movie seem taut."

'Edge of Darkness' trailer

The Hollywood Reporter
: "Although it has retained much of its grit and intrigue, bringing the original Troy Kennedy Martin script up to speed from its original mid-'80s nuclear-arms race context is another matter. Their attempts to update the political agenda result in a scenario that comes off a tad far-fetched where its villains are concerned. But in between the two 'Edge of Darkness' assignments, director Campbell did a couple of Bond pictures -- most notably 'Casino Royale' -- and that raw, sinewy energy comes very much into play here."

Slant Magazine
: "The transfer to a featureless, present-day Boston works none of the magic it did for writer William Monahan's 'The Departed,' given the absence of colorful locals like Alec Baldwin's crotch-grabbing hedonist, as well as the aggressive whittling of a formerly big-canvas drama to one with a handful of principals and the failure to exploit a ready-made Irish-Catholic guilt motif."

New York Observer: "Based on a silly 1985 BBC TV series that tried to terrify England about the threat of Russia's nuclear policy, and updated by a number of people who worked on Martin Scorsese's Boston cop drama 'The Departed' (including screenwriter William Monahan), 'Edge of Darkness' is again set in the city of tea parties and baked beans, but there is nothing revolutionary or tasty about it. Mr. Gibson, who is growing facial lines like lichens, plays Tom Craven, a tough, widowed Boston detective with a 24-year-old daughter named Emma who works for a top-secret government corporation called Northmoor that makes illegal nuclear weapons under the heading of classified priority stuff, weapons that might be sold to all the wrong people, like Osama Bin Laden."

Chicago Tribune: "This is really two films. There's the Gibson slaughter fest, which we have seen before. And there's the other film, the one more like the miniseries. Director Martin Campbell, who did such wonderful work on the recent James Bond reboot 'Casino Royale' cannot linger long over any one cloak-of-darkness meeting the way he did when he had six-plus hours. He probably should have excised a father/daughter dream sequence or two. But by letting Winstone's ambiguous middle man share and, in fact, steal scenes from Gibson (it's scripted that way), 'Edge of Darkness' hangs in there and fleshes out its '70s-style symphony of paranoia."

Based on the reviews, will you put up the money to see Mel Gibson's return to the silver screen?
Yes 198 (83.9%)
No38 (16.1%)