On day 3 of the Sundance Film Festival, Ben Affleck gets walloped by the economy, Kristen Stewart strips down, stars hunt for swag, and documentaries offer rare inside glimpses at Al Qaeda and North Korea. Our daily compilation of all the festival buzz follows after the jump. On day 3 of the Sundance Film Festival, Ben Affleck gets walloped by the economy, Kristen Stewart strips down, stars hunt for swag, and documentaries offer rare inside glimpses at Al Qaeda and North Korea. Our daily compilation of all the festival buzz follows after the jump.

Daily Buzz: Cinematical's daily "Sundance in 60 Seconds" digest tells you who's saying what on Twitter and where to find the best online galleries of this week's celebrity photos from the festival.

IndieWIRE finds Josh Radnor basking in the positive feedback from two crowd-pleasing screenings of his directing debut, 'happythankyoumoreplease.'

Visiting the giveaway merchandise suites, The Wrap's Sharon Waxman finds the swag less swanky than in previous years. She also bumps into freebie-hunting celebrities, including Constantine Maroulis, Morgan Spurlock, and 'Buffy'-costar-turned-indie-director Amber Benson (Slamdance entry 'Drones').


The Wrap's Report on Sundance Swag Suites


The Wrap also looks at the buzz surrounding two documentaries: social-media cautionary tale 'Catfish' (whose makers say it's been getting some bites) and 'Casino Jack and the United States of Money,' Oscar-winner Alex Gibney's film about convicted lobbyist Jack Abramoff.

Interviews: Kristen Stewart, who's in two Sundance movies, talks briefly with MTV about her role in 'Welcome to the Rileys,' reassuring her 'Twilight' fanbase that they won't be too shocked by her role as a hooker/stripper.

MTV talks to Kristen Stewart about 'Welcome to the Rileys'


IndieWIRE talks to Amanda Peet, Oliver Platt, and Catherine Keener about their real-estate comedy 'Please Give.' The site also has an in-depth interview with 'HOWL' star James Franco. And indieWIRE grabbed video of the screening Q&A with Laura Poitras, director of 'The Oath,' an inside look at Al Qaeda.

News: Will there be many headline-making deals at the festival this year? Depends who you ask. A report in the New York Times examines the soft indie-film market and points fingers at both distributors (art-film divisions of major studios that have shuttered completely or at least overspent on movies that flopped) and Sundance itself (for focusing on low star-wattage movies that are hard to market). Nonetheless, indieWIRE blogger Anne Thompson says reps from all the big art-house distributors are trolling around Park City with dollars burning holes in their pockets.

The Wrap caught Affleck, whose Sundance drama 'The Company Men' centers on the dismal downsizing economy, asking mogul Harvey Weinstein why American indie films today don't drum up the same level of excitement as those of a decade ago. It's because American audiences don't want to see downbeat movies anymore, Weinstein replied, citing the poor box office showings of 'The Road' and 'The Hurt Locker.'

You wouldn't expect there to be much of a market for short films, but Entertainment Weekly reports that Spike Jonze has sold his half-hour robot romance 'I'm Here' to the IFC cable channel.

Reviews: Bookmark indieWIRE"s comprehensive one-page guide to the entire Sundance lineup, including its criticWIRE grades that average the scores from various critics' reviews of the films that have screened so far. IndieWIRE also has a round-up today of what reviewers are saying about 'Hesher,' 'happythankyoumoreplease,' and 'Catfish.'

'The Company Men' gets upbeat reviews from Cinematical ("a horror film for the white-collar workers over 50"), Voice Film ("the film 'Up in the Air' might have been, had it been made by and for grown-ups"), and Entertainment Weekly ("destined to be one of the talked-about highlights of the festival"). Cinematical also has positive reviews of backwoods slasher spoof 'Tucker and Dale vs. Evil,' horror chiller 'Frozen,' and dark comedy 'Armless.' Voice Film gives a generally positive review to 'Please Give.' Also earning strong reviews from festivalgoers is 'His and Hers," a warm, emotional documentary about Irish women of all ages.

IndieWIRE likes coming-of-age comedy 'Boy,' the second feature by 'Eagle vs. Shark' director Taika Waititi.

Trailers: Cinematical found this one for the cool-looking sci-fi short 'Pumzi.'

Trailer for 'Pumzi'


And Voice Film found this one for the subversive doc 'The Red Chapel,' a 'Borat'-like stunt involving two Korean-Danish comics who infiltrate North Korea as part of a cultural exchange.

Trailer for 'The Red Chapel'