Not all epic trilogies are set in a world of sci-fi fantasy.

A dynamite cast of actors, directors and screenwriters have assembled to adapt David Peace's series of 'Red Riding' novels, inspired-by-reality thrillers about the "Yorkshire Ripper", a gruesome murderer who targeted UK girls throughout the '70s and '80s, leaving thirteen young casualties in his wake.

Originally aired on the BBC in early 2009, the films will be released theatrically -- stateside, all at once-- on February 5, following this week's premiere at Sundance.

Though each film in 'The Red Riding Trilogy' has in common the same screenwriter ('Tideland''s Tony Grisoni), each chapter of takes place in a different year, and is helmed by a different -- Julian Jarrold ('Becoming Jane'), James Marsh ('Man on Wire') and Anand Tucker ('Leap Year') -- who each bring their own spin to a gritty tale that spans decades.

Watch the trailers after the jump. Not all epic trilogies are set in a world of sci-fi fantasy.

A dynamite crew of British screen talent have assembled to adapt David Peace's series of 'Red Riding' novels, inspired-by-reality thrillers about the "Yorkshire Ripper," a gruesome murderer who targeted UK girls throughout the '70s and '80s, leaving 13 young casualties in his wake.

Originally aired on the BBC in early 2009, the films will be released theatrically -- stateside, all at once -- on February 5, following this week's premiere at the Sundance Film Festival.

Though each film in 'The Red Riding Trilogy' has the same screenwriter ('Tideland''s Tony Grisoni), each chapter of takes place in a different year, and is helmed by a different director -- Julian Jarrold ('Becoming Jane'), James Marsh ('Man on Wire') and Anand Tucker ('Leap Year') -- each of whom bring their own spin to a gritty tale that spans decades.

'1974'
The first film, directed by Jarrold, follows crime reporter Eddie Dunford (Andrew Garfield) as he tracks down unsolved cases of abducted children. What he finds isn't just the Ripper's first victims , but also deep-seeded corruption within the investigation, and a dangerous, seductive entanglement with a victim's mother (Rebecca Hall), all of which combine, by the looks of the trailer, to send Dunford away in a fast car with a bloody nose.



'1980'
Marsh's '1984' picks up six years later, when after a highly-publicized, unsuccessful investigation into the Ripper murders, Manchester sleuth Peter Hunter ( Paddy Considine) is brought to Yorkshire to whip it into shape. But even after a few intriguing leads -- cover-ups, perhaps a copy-cat killer -- even he and his "super squad" can't seem to penetrate the thick web of corruption surrounding the murders.



'1983'
Anand Tucker's final installment in the series has police chief Maurice Robson (David Morrissey) sleepless over the possibility of nabbing the wrong man for the Ripper murders, and attorney John Piggott (Mark Addy) dipping back into the murky case, to seemingly treacherous results. The last chapter of the 'Red Riding' trilogy seems packed with revelation after revelation -- more conspiracy, more intrigue, more Paddy Considine -- building to a climactic end to a decade-long saga.