CATEGORIES Reviews
It's survival of the fittest at the box office and unfortunately for the new Charles Darwin bio 'Creation,' the consensus is director Jon Amiel ('Copycat,' 'Entrapment') has not created a great work.

Critics feel the story meanders along -- kind of like the crabs that Darwin famously studied -- resulting in a film that lacks momentum. It's based on a Darwin bio by Randal Keynes, a Darwin descendant, called 'Annie's Box,' which examines the death of the Darwins' young child, Annie, and its effect on the scientist.

In 'Creation,' Brit actor Paul Bettany ('The Da Vinci Code,' 'A Beautiful Mind') is Darwin and Bettany's real-life wife Jennifer Connelly ('A Beautiful Mind,' 'The Day the Earth Stood Still') plays Darwin's wife, Emma. They generally receive favorable marks, though not overwhelming, with Bettany getting the better notices on the average.

Darwin, of course, wrote 'The Origin of Species,' which detailed the theory of evolution. There's some overseas speculation about whether American audiences would saddle up to a Darwin biopic, given the sometimes still controversial topic. However, it might be lukewarm reviews that keep people away from 'Creation' and not a blowback against Darwinism.

Check out the reviews and tell us what you think. It's survival of the fittest at the box office and unfortunately for the new Charles Darwin bio 'Creation,' the consensus is director Jon Amiel ('Copycat,' 'Entrapment') has not created a great work.

Critics feel the story meanders along -- kind of like the crabs that Darwin famously studied -- resulting in a film that lacks momentum. It's based on a Darwin bio by Randal Keynes, a Darwin descendant, called 'Annie's Box,' which examines the death of the Darwins' young child, Annie, and its effect on the scientist.

In 'Creation,' Brit actor Paul Bettany ('The Da Vinci Code,' 'A Beautiful Mind') is Darwin and Bettany's real-life wife Jennifer Connelly ('A Beautiful Mind,' 'The Day the Earth Stood Still') plays Darwin's wife, Emma. They generally receive favorable marks, though not overwhelming, with Bettany getting the better notices on the average.

Darwin, of course, wrote 'The Origin of Species,' which detailed the theory of evolution. There's some overseas speculation about whether American audiences would saddle up to a Darwin biopic, given the sometimes still controversial topic. However, it might be lukewarm reviews that keep people away from 'Creation' and not a blowback against Darwinism.

Check out the reviews and tell us what you think.

Entertainment Weekly:
"As Darwin, the normally fierce Paul Bettany comes off like a cringing, cowering country beadle right out of Dickens. He doesn't fight for his theory -- he apologizes for it. Darwin knows all too well that the revolution he's creating undercuts the concept of creation at the heart of the Bible."

The New Yorker: "As a journey through Darwin's discoveries, 'Creation' fails, although, given the intricacy and the patience of his working methods, it is hard to imagine how such a film might succeed. There is intensity here, but no impetus; if you want to see Paul Bettany fizzing with the drama of scientific findings, watch him instead as Maturin, the pre-Darwinian surgeon and sidekick to Russell Crowe, clambering around the Galápagos in 'Master and Commander,' a tale with a strand of Beagle in its genes."

Variety: "... 'Creation' feels somewhat static in storytelling terms. Once basic conflicts are established, we simply wait for Darwin to come to terms with his grief, marriage and imminent notoriety. Not much "happens," though the pic does its best to maintain energy in both physical presentation and mixed-chronology structure."

'Creation' trailer


New York Observer: "The movie is not so much about the masterpiece that results from so much tribulation, but about the agony Darwin endures while writing it. As he retreats from society and almost every human contact, the film has an alienating effect. For a movie dedicated to one of the most exciting, groundbreaking books ever written, 'Creation' is disappointingly dull."

Los Angeles Times: "... there is angst, lots of it, for Paul Bettany to muck around in as he portrays the great evolutionist. Not that angst is a bad thing, but here it makes a muddle of Darwin's story. Even the sheer beauty of the setting, the sets and the attention to the detail in re-creating his family life in a bucolic English village in the 1850s is not enough of a distraction, though it is a reminder of Amiel's long history with period pieces, 'Sommersby' probably the best known here."

Associated Press: "'Creation' doesn't aim to preach Darwinism, which would be a pointless exercise given how dug in people are on both sides of the matter. Going right to the progenitor of the issue, though, the film does reflect that contradictory beliefs can co-exist peaceably, even under the same roof, trumped by rules of attraction and devotion rooted in our genes."