Watching the 2010 Golden Globes was like crashing someone else's family reunion. Although the faces were familiar and the warmth seemed genuine, there were too many in-jokes, remembrances of relatives long gone, wince-worthy moments where someone who may have had too much to drink said something borderline offensive, pats of self-congratulation and announcements that held about as much suspense as toasts at a wedding rehearsal dinner.

All that's to be expected, even encouraged, in a Hollywood awards ceremony ... but it makes for dull television.

If you didn't watch the show -- and odds are good you didn't -- you probably have only a few major questions about how the NBC broadcast played, questions we will attempt to answer below. Watching the 2010 Golden Globes was like crashing someone else's family reunion. Although the faces were familiar and the warmth seemed genuine, there were too many in-jokes, remembrances of relatives long gone, wince-worthy moments where someone who may have had too much to drink said something borderline offensive, pats of self-congratulation and announcements that held about as much suspense as toasts at a wedding rehearsal dinner.

All that's to be expected, even encouraged, in a Hollywood awards ceremony ... but it makes for dull television.

If you didn't watch the show -- and odds are good you didn't -- you probably have only a few major questions about how the NBC broadcast played, questions we will attempt to answer below.

How was Ricky Gervais as host? Just OK, and not nearly as irreverent as the hype leading up to the show had promised. His jokes' targets were largely predictable (actors' self-importance, Hollywood plastic surgery, blatant plugs for his own DVDs). He made about half a dozen jokes in a row about his penis, which was half a dozen too many. For the most part, his performance was a reminder of why the Hollywood Foreign Press Association hasn't felt the need to hire a Globes host for the last 15 years.

Ricky Gervais' opening monologue at the Golden Globes


Gervais nearly redeemed himself at the end of the show, however, when he hoisted a beer and said, "I like a drink as much as the next man. Unless the next man is Mel Gibson." (Gibson, who than came on to present an award, took it in stride.) That may have been the biggest laugh and most memorable line of the evening.

Ricky Gervais introduces Mel Gibson


Who gave the best speech? The night's first winner, 'Precious' co-star Mo'Nique, gave the most emotional and moving speech; it was all downhill after that. "Dexter' star Michael C. Hall was quietly moving as well, especially if you knew that he was wearing a knit cap because, as he'd reluctantly revealed earlier in the weekend, he's battling Hodgkin's lymphoma. Meryl Streep, paying tribute to her mom, worked into her speech a fundraising pitch for Partners in Health (one of the evening's many pleas to viewers to contribute to Haitian earthquake relief efforts). 'Inglourious Basterds'' Christoph Waltz's speech was an extended astronomical metaphor playing on the word "globe." (This coming a couple days after his Critics Choice Awards speech riffing on the word "Choice." Wonder what he's going to say if he wins an Oscar.) Robert Downey Jr.'s speech was a cleverly worded list of people he wasn't going to thank. And Jeff Bridges, who got a standing ovation simply because he's so long overdue for a Globe (and an Oscar), warmly thanked both of his late parents for encouraging him to join the family business.

Mo'Nique's Golden Globes acceptance speech


Least classy speeches: the two by James Cameron. In the first, for Best Director, he said he'd keep it short because "I have to pee something fierce." But then he went on at length anyway. (At least he gave a shout-out to his ex-wife, 'Hurt Locker' helmer Kathryn Bigelow, who'd been the favorite to beat him.) Then he thanked his cast in a sentence in the made-up language of 'Avatar.' In the second, for Best Drama, he urged everyone in the hall to pat themselves on the back for being in show business and entertaining people around the world. Which, by the way, he's still the king of, apparently.

Were there any surprises? A few, including Paul McCartney's joke that "Animation isn't just for children. It's also for adults who take drugs." Best Song winner Ryan Bingham (for 'The Weary Kind,' from 'Crazy Heart') pulled a Christine Lahti and was out drinking at the bar when his name was called, so he didn't get make a speech. (Co-composer T Bone Burnett accepted on his behalf and joked that his missing partner must be "up in the air" somewhere, a reference to George Clooney's character in 'Up in the Air,' whose name happens to be Ryan Bingham.) 'Big Love''s Chloë Sevigny was such an unexpected winner in her category (TV Supporting Actress) that the NBC chyron misspelled her name as "Chloï." And surprise wins for 'The Hangover,' Sandra Bullock (for 'The Blind Side') and Cameron mean we now have to take them seriously as Oscar contenders.

Were there any wardrobe malfunctions? No, but not for lack of trying. Someone stepped on the train of Sevigny's gown and ripped it as she was walking to the podium. You'd expect the pairing of co-presenters Cher and Christina Aguilera to be a malfunction waiting to happen, but if it did, it passed too quickly for our DVR pause button to capture. Thigh-high slits or deep cleavage were the order of the evening for many stars, particularly Jennifer Aniston, Mariah Carey, Halle Berry, and Christina Hendricks, all of whom must have kept NBC censors nervous throughout the evening. Even Gervais quickly abandoned his tie and unbuttoned his shirt, threatening to expose his own man-cleavage as the night wore on.

Chloe's dress rip


How many jokes were there at NBC's expense? We counted just four during the ceremony. Gervais had a couple, including the obligatory hope-they-don't-replace-me-with-Jay-Leno line. 'The Good Wife''s Julianna Margulies thanked CBS for keeping its commitment to 10PM dramas. And Arnold Schwarzenegger joked that the only way the already wealthy Cameron could earn more money would be for NBC to hire him -- and then fire him. But no one beat the joke Tina Fey told before the show. Remarking on the downpour dampening the red carpet, she said, "It's not rain. It's God crying for NBC."

Any drunken outbursts? Hard to say. For all the drinking going on, all the remarks, even the too-much-information ones, seemed well-rehearsed. (Sample: Robert De Niro introducing Martin Scorsese: "We're like an old married couple. We built a life together, we have great memories, we just don't sleep together anymore." Anymore?)

Mostly, there were the sort of in-jokes and reminiscences you'd expect at a family gathering. Jane Krakowski said '30 Rock' co-star Alec Baldwin (who wasn't there) was always staring at her boobs. The Beverly Hilton ballroom was cited by Jeff Bridges as the place where he and his mom had won a cha cha contest, by 'Mad Men' creator Matthew Weiner as the place he'd attended a bar mitzvah as a child, and by Drew Barrymore as the place she'd been attending these ceremonies for most of her life, since age 7.

It was fun, sometimes, to watch these stars drink (and perhaps to drink with them) and remember old times and congratulate each other, but it wasn't dramatic, must-see viewing, and you could be forgiven if, like Ryan Bingham, you got distracted and left the hall to go spend some time at the bar.