Reviews don't get much harsher than the ones so far rendered for Jackie Chan's latest film, the family-targeted 'Spy Next Door.'

In fact, the Lionsgate-distributed movie, which premieres Friday, registered a rather inauspicious "0%" score on Rotten Tomatoes.

Take a look at these reviews and tell us what you think. Reviews don't get much harsher than the ones so far rendered for Jackie Chan's latest film, the family-targeted 'Spy Next Door.'

In fact, the Lionsgate-distributed movie, which premieres Friday, registered a rather inauspicious "0%" score on Rotten Tomatoes.

Take a look at these reviews and tell us what you think.

Roger Ebert: "Let's see. Jackie Chan is a spy working for China and the CIA, who falls in love with a widow with three kids. He retires to be with them, but his job follows him home. Mom goes to be with her sick dad. Evil Russians have a plot to control the world's oil supply, and this requires them to chase Jackie and the kids through shopping malls, large empty factories and so on. Jackie's character is named Bob Ho, which reminds me of someone. Truth in reviewing requires me to report that 'The Spy Next Door' is precisely what you would expect from a PG-rated Jackie Chan comedy with that plot. If that's what you're looking for, you won't be disappointed. It's not what I was looking for."

Chicago Tribune: "On the ground or twirling in a stunt harness above it, Jackie Chan brings an air of determined good cheer to even the most metallic of clunkers. 'The Spy Next Door' proves this. Chan's new all-ages vehicle is smooth like oatmeal. It's hard to imagine anyone being offended, except fans of good comedy."

Associated Press: "Like many action stars, Chan is looking for a piece of the lucrative family market with 'The Spy Next Door' and his upcoming 'The Karate Kid.' Maybe he'll have some luck with the latter, a remake with some built-in appeal, because 'The Spy Next Door' is the sort of slop to make you long for a less-irritating neighbor, like Barney the dinosaur or some Teletubbies. Maybe Jar-Jar Binks."

The 'Spy Next Door' trailer

The Village Voice: "Like director Brian Levant's last two outings -- 2002's 'Snow Dogs,' 2005's 'Are We There Yet?' 'The Spy Next Door' is immediately forgettable family entertainment, suitable for release only in the dung-heap month of January."

Variety: "It's a sad day for Jackie Chan fans when the action-comedy star is reduced to a vehicle as lame as 'The Spy Next Door.' As an undercover CIA agent ill-equipped to babysit his girlfriend's three kids, Chan struggles gamely to charm, but the pic's cartoonish jokes and misfired gags are likely to elicit more eye rolls than laughs. That said, little ones enticed by the trailer and devoted Chan fans may join forces to generate a decent opening weekend, followed by a sharp drop-off once this 'Spy's' cover is blown."

The Orlando Sentinal: "'The Spy Next Door' should have been a sure thing, Chan's version of 'Kindergarten Cop' and 'The Pacifier,' the "man of action overwhelmed by child-rearing" formula. But the few stunts were plainly done by others. And the outtakes show Chan, 55, fumbling even the simple flip-the-chair-with-your-foot tricks. No sense blaming director Brian Levant ('Jingle All the Way') for not knowing enough to show our favorite human special effect in one, clean take -- scrambling up a wall or sliding down an escalator with a Fred Astaire grace. Levant's a hack, but he was covering for a star who has lost a step.

Screen International: "Martial arts maestro Jackie Chan moves down a demographic agewise from his U.S. hits 'Rush Hour' and the Shanghai series with 'The Spy Next Door,' a mirthless, unimaginative piece of entertainment aimed at the 'Spy Kids' crowd."

Time Out New York: "Just play the movie in your head and save the money. The only curious thing here is the referendum 'Spy' holds on an aging action star's prospects, like those of an athlete. Chan won't be entering into gubernatorial politics anytime soon, nor does his high-kicking variety of stunt work lend itself to Stallone shoot-'em-ups. The little action here will disappoint fans; it's way too choppy. And the sole laugh? The blooper reel, in which Chan admits, "I hate English." As the body slows down, that's going to become more of a problem, Jackie.
CATEGORIES Reviews