CATEGORIES Movies, Video
We had to doublecheck to make sure this video wasn't from The Onion -- some kind of elaborate spoof -- before posting it here.

We know that a good sci-fi movie transports you to different worlds and times and the best ones make you feel -- if only for a few hours -- that you're a part of a new and otherworldly environment.

But what happens when the film is over? According to this report from CNN, some viewers are actually feeling bouts of depression after watching 'Avatar' and being immersed in its alternative world of Pandora.

Watch the clip after the jump.
We had to doublecheck to make sure this video wasn't from The Onion -- some kind of elaborate spoof -- before posting it here.

We know that a good sci-fi movie transports you to different worlds and times and the best ones make you feel -- if only for a few hours -- that you're a part of a new and otherworldly environment.

But what happens when the film is over? According to this report from CNN, some viewers are actually feeling bouts of depression after watching 'Avatar' and being immersed in its alternative world of Pandora.


Now, we're a bit wary of calling this a trend (yes, we see the irony of promoting this and expressing our wariness about it), given that this CNN story seems to be predicated mostly on Internet comments, which may or may not be false or exaggerated. But it didn't stop CNN from bringing in an entertainment reporter and a psychotherapist to discuss the issue.

"I think the depression is widespread enough that it is an actual phenomenon," said Jo Piazza, who points to the more than 1,000 messages dealing with Post-'Avatar' Depression on one fan site.

Piazza adds a bit of armchair psychology later on, stating, "I spoke to a lot of [posters] and a lot of these people are lonely to begin with ... a lot of them don't have a lot going on in their lives right now ... so I think the movie didn't create depression. It opened up a portal for them to express their depression ... [but] through finding this community, they're starting to feel better about themselves and their lives."

Deborah Huso of AOL Health has been following this as well and, in her latest article, discusses how the movie has caused both existential dread over impossible dreams of an unattainable utopia and the positive inspirational themes some have taken from the film.

So what do you think? Is James Cameron's movie not only shattering box office records but -- insert hyperbolic tone here -- hurting or healing the nation's consciousness? Did you walk out of the theater feeling better, worse or the same as you did before?