Starring Amy Adams and Matthew Goode, 'Leap Year' hopes to be that sweet Irish trifle during an otherwise wretched month of studio programming.

In the film, Adams plays a hopelessly romantic Manhattanite waiting for her upper-class, cardiologist boyfriend (Adam Scott) to propose. When he doesn't get down on one knee, she decides to follow him to Ireland to propose marriage on Leap day, a supposed Irish tradition where a woman can propose to a man on Feb 29.

Her journey to Dublin doesn't end up exactly how she had planned, as a handsome Irish bloke (Matthew Goode) turns out to be a lot more than just a feisty pub-owner and sometimes cab-driver.

With a measly 17 percent rating at Rotten Tomatoes, the critics have mostly not warmed to this winter romantic comedy. Roger Ebert points out, though, that the two leads -- Adams and Goode -- have the necessary "buoyancy" to keep this film from completely sinking. Here's a selection of 'Leap Year' reviews. Starring Amy Adams and Matthew Goode, 'Leap Year' hopes to be that sweet Irish trifle during an otherwise wretched month of studio programming.

In the film, Adams plays a hopelessly romantic Manhattanite waiting for her upper-class, cardiologist boyfriend (Adam Scott) to propose. When he doesn't get down on one knee, she decides to follow him to Ireland to propose marriage on Leap day, a supposed Irish tradition where a woman can propose to a man on Feb 29.

Her journey to Dublin doesn't end up exactly how she had planned, as a handsome Irish bloke (Matthew Goode) turns out to be a lot more than just a feisty pub-owner and sometimes cab-driver.

With a measly 17 percent rating at Rotten Tomatoes, the critics have mostly not warmed to this winter romantic comedy. Roger Ebert points out, though, that the two leads -- Adams and Goode -- have the necessary "buoyancy" to keep this film from completely sinking. Here's a selection of 'Leap Year' reviews.

Chicago Tribune
: "Again, we have a brittle Type-A female protagonist (Adams, as Anna) who must be brought down to earth (i.e., humiliated in various, artlessly staged slapsticky ways -- director Anand Tucker has no gift for physical comedy) and wised up by the man she's clearly destined to find. He is an Irish pub owner nursing a broken heart, played by Goode. And as he's so much more sympathetic and charming than the man she's with at the moment (Adam Scott, playing the cardiologist boyfriend), the movie's conflict is nonexistent."

Chicago Sun-Times: "Amy Adams and Matthew Goode sell it with great negative chemistry and appeal. Adams has an ability to make things seem fresh and new; everything seems to be happening to her for the first time, and she has a particularly innocent sincerity that's convincing. Goode is wisely not made too handsome. Oh, you could shoot him as handsome; he's good-looking, let's face it. But the director, Anand Tucker, shoots him as annoyed, rude and scruffy. Hair not too well combed."

Entertainment Weekly: "Tucker keeps the emerald travelogue images crisp and clean and the emotions modest, so that the entire movie hinges, more or less, on the charming/ cantankerous love-hate tangles of its dueling stars. If the young Ann-Margret had been allowed to wiggle her brain as much as her bod, she might have come off something like Amy Adams. Is there an actress today who can suffuse a single scene with so many infectious mood swings? As Anna, she's fiery and vulnerable, wistful and exuberant; she lends a rare dignity to the portrayal of a woman who doesn't know what she wants."

Miami Herald: "The worst part of this equation is that the appealing Amy Adams -- just seen in 2009 as the Julie half of 'Julie & Julia' -- has no excuse for being part of this mess. She's a fresh and likeable actress who is perfectly capable of holding her own with such heavy hitters as Meryl Streep and Philip Seymour Hoffman (her co-stars in 'Doubt'). Why she is a party to such blarney remains a mystery as puzzling as the question of why anybody thought 'Leap Year' was a good idea."

'Leap Year' Trailer


Village Voice: "'Leap Year' belongs to the Prada backlash subgenre of women's pictures -- epitomized by 'The Proposal' -- in which smart, stylish women must be muddied, abased, ridiculed, and degraded in order to get their man. She's uptight and hyper-organized; he's a grinning oaf who chews with his mouth open. See where this is going? Written by Harry Elfont and Deborah Kaplan ('Made of Honor'), and directed by Anand Tucker ('Shopgirl'), the movie seems a rehash of 1930s conventions -- 'It Happened One Night' in Ireland. (Oh, no! There's only one bed left at the B&B!) Free from sex or naughty language, 'Leap Year' appears to have been designed for that huge mother-daughter matinee market, ahem."

Arizona Republic: "Lovely woman, Amy Adams, just a delightful on-screen presence, and a fine actress, as well. What's she doing in this? This being 'Leap Year,' a by-the-numbers as predictable as it is cloying. It plays like a remake of a classic-rock tune that's already been done to death; whatever surprises might be found -- and you've got to look awfully hard to find any -- are attributable solely to the artists' performance."

James Berardinelli: "As a travelogue of rural Ireland, 'Leap Year' isn't half-bad, although it tends to reinforce certain stereotypes about mud, rain, and rampant superstition. This is the Ireland one expects to see in a movie, where the old men all talk and look a little like leprechauns and the women are motherly and full of good advice. The film gets some mileage from the fish-out-of-water aspect of Anna's story but, like most of the elements in 'Leap Year,' it doesn't quite work. The scene in which she practically wrecks a small hotel room trying to plug in her blackberry is more cringe-inducing than funny."

Will you see 'Leap Year' based on the reviews alone?
Yes92 (48.9%)
No96 (51.1%)
CATEGORIES Reviews