The only sentient beings who might not know we're having a vampire "moment" are actual vampires, though, judging by the box office numbers, it is likely that even they are hitting theaters for (late night) screenings of the 'Twilight' saga.

Sure, Hollywood has been obsessed with vampires for a while. The last 10 years alone have given us 'Underworld,' 'Van Helsing,' 'Blade 2,' 'Queen of the Damned,' '30 Days of Night' and 'The Little Vampire,' among others. But the arrival of 'Twilight' was a game-changer. With its teen-friendly angle on vampire desire -- where human blood is replaced by a "vegetarian" option and sexual hunger is repressed beneath snuggles and baseball -- 'Twilight's' astonishing success has enticed studios to breathe some new life into the undead.

Enter 'Daybreakers,' a new entry to the genre, a film that has a unique spin on vampires while preserving their most traditional of pastimes: bloodshed. Directed by 'Undead' helmsmen the Spierig brothers, 'Daybreakers' takes place in a not-too-distant future, where humans are an endangered species thanks to the vampires who have overtaken the earth's population. Edward Dalton (Ethan Hawke) plays a vampire researcher in search of a blood substitute that would help spare the earth's remaining humans. After making a startling breakthrough, Edward must battle his fellow vampires to determine the fate of the human race.

Early reviews are mixed, with appreciation of the conservation-oriented premise tempered by criticism of the movie's graphic violence. Here's what the reviewers are saying: The only sentient beings who might not know we're having a vampire "moment" are actual vampires, though, judging by the box office numbers, it is likely that even they are hitting theaters for (late night) screenings of the 'Twilight' saga.

Sure, Hollywood has been obsessed with vampires for a while. The last 10 years alone have given us 'Underworld,' 'Van Helsing,' 'Blade 2,' 'Queen of the Damned,' '30 Days of Night' and 'The Little Vampire,' among others. But the arrival of 'Twilight' was a game-changer. With its teen-friendly angle on vampire desire -- where human blood is replaced by a "vegetarian" option and sexual hunger is repressed beneath snuggles and baseball -- 'Twilight's' astonishing success has enticed studios to breathe some new life into the undead.

Enter 'Daybreakers,' a new entry to the genre, a film that attempts a unique spin on vampires while preserving their most traditional of pastimes: bloodshed. Directed by 'Undead' helmsmen the Spierig brothers, 'Daybreakers' takes place in a not-too-distant future, where humans are an endangered species thanks to the vampires who have overtaken the earth's population. Edward Dalton (Ethan Hawke) plays a vampire researcher in search of a blood substitute that would help spare the earth's remaining humans. After making a startling breakthrough, Edward must battle his fellow vampires to determine the fate of the human race.

Early reviews are mixed, with appreciation of the conservation-oriented premise tempered by criticism of the movie's graphic violence. Here's what the reviewers are saying:

Time Out New York: "A darkly stylish horror film that's unusually solid for a January release ... the film feels more like a closely guarded labor of love than your typical Hollywood slot-filler."

Variety: "'Daybreakers' emerges as a competent but routine chase thriller that lacks attention-getting dialogue, unique characters or memorable setpieces that might make it a genre keeper rather than a polished time-filler."

Village Voice: "There are pleasures here: The "Subsiders," degenerate, starving, cannibal Nosferatus, are effectively awful; Sam Neill is hambone-wicked as a vulpine CEO. But wearisome "Ain't it cool?" video-game splatter-violence is all that's memorable of the action, while a (mixed) metaphorical subtext of conservationism can't save a text that squanders its actors."
'The Daybreakers' trailer


Entertainment Weekly: "It's like 'Children of Men' with exploding-plasma shock effects. The best thing you can say about the movie is that it pours some very old blood into a new plastic bottle."

Arizona Republic: "The Spierigs create a nicely eerie atmosphere, one fueled on either side of the vampire equation by a desperate need for survival. 'Daybreakers' isn't a great film, but it's a good one, and in a market oddly lousy with vampire tales, it's an original."

Chicago Sun-Times: "The movie, directed by Australia's twin Spierig brothers ('Undead,' 2003), looks good in its gray sunless scenes evoking twilight (cough). ... This intriguing premise, alas, ends as so many movies do these days, with fierce fights and bloodshed."

Based on the reviews, will you see 'Daybreakers'?
Yes, it sounds awesome!82 (81.2%)
No, it sounds like just another vampire flick.19 (18.8%)
CATEGORIES Reviews