CATEGORIES Video

Filmed in glorious 1940s Technicolor, 'The Kid From Brooklyn' was the second film in which Danny Kaye was paired with two of the loveliest dames ever to grace the silver screen, Virginia Mayo and Vera-Ellen.

Released in 1946, directed by Norman Z. McLeod and produced by Samuel Goldwyn, it seemed that everyone in Hollywood at the time wanted to hitch their sails to Kaye's fast-rising comic star. He'd headed right for California after conquering Broadway in the 1941 musical 'Lady in the Dark,' and 'Kid' was his third Goldwyn-produced venture in a row. A knockabout and rollicking flick, it's your free movie of the day.

Filmed in glorious 1940s Technicolor, 'The Kid From Brooklyn' was the second film in which Danny Kaye was paired with two of the loveliest dames ever to grace the silver screen, Virginia Mayo and Vera-Ellen.

Released in 1946, directed by Norman Z. McLeod and produced by Samuel Goldwyn, it seemed that everyone in Hollywood at the time wanted to hitch their sails to Kaye's fast-rising comic star. He'd headed right for California after conquering Broadway in the 1941 musical 'Lady in the Dark,' and 'Kid' was his third Goldwyn-produced venture in a row. A knockabout and rollicking flick, it's your free movie of the day.

Mostly, 'Kid' is recommended for the way it showcases Kaye's prodigious brand of physical comedy and impeccable timing. The premise finds Kaye portraying a bashful milkman, Burleigh Sullivan, who unintentionally flattens a gruff prizefighter, Speed McFarlane.

Speed, you see, was guilty of trying to charm Sullivan's sister -- that's what provoked him to pop his fist to begin with. Much to his bewilderment, however, Sullivan suddenly finds himself fast-tracked toward lunacy. Before he can even process what's happening, he's being promoted left, right and center as an amazing boxer, unaware that his challengers are being paid to lose to him. The poor guy winds up so infatuated with his own measly hooks and jabs that he risks losing the affection of a woman who loves him.

Kaye outdid himself in 1947 with his next film, 'The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,' when he was again directed by MacLeod and again teamed with Mayo. But 'Kid' is light, fast and sweet -- and for Kaye fans, a fine coming attraction.