After making a name for herself in 2006's 'The Devil Wears Prada,' Emily Blunt has looked to secure that next rite of passage for an actress with big career aspirations: the Victorian period drama.

And she's mostly well-received by critics for her work in the independently distributed 'The Young Victoria,' even though the consensus is -- as is typical with this slow-paced genre -- the movie comes off a little flat. Read the reviews and tell us what you think.
After making a name for herself in 2006's 'The Devil Wears Prada,' Emily Blunt has looked to secure that next rite of passage for an actress with big career aspirations: the Victorian period drama.

And she's mostly well-received by critics for her work in the independently distributed 'The Young Victoria,' even though the consensus is -- as is typical with this slow-paced genre -- the movie comes off a little flat. Read the reviews and tell us what you think.

The New Yorker: "From the start, it feels handsome, steady, and stuck; the ties that bind the historical bio-pic are no looser than those which constrain a royal personage, and the frustration to which Victoria would later admit ('I had led a very unhappy life as a child -- had no scope for my very violent feelings of affection') is legible in the face of Emily Blunt, who takes the title role."

Boxoffice Magazine: "The term "heritage cinema" seems to have been invented for British films that dwell on elements of the nation's chequered history, much of which finds a ready market overseas. The 'Young Victoria' is no exception -- a beautifully mounted and costumed odyssey into the early life of the monarch. With a script by Julian Fellowes, who won an Oscar for his screenplay for Gosford Park, 'The Young Victoria' positively sizzles with impeccable pedigree."

Entertainment Weekly:
"On Wikipedia, you can find the first photograph of Queen Victoria (it's from 1844), and though she looks younger and more relaxed than the famous image we're used to -- the frowning dowager in her black lace widow's kerchief -- she's a far cry from ... well, Emily Blunt. Blunt, however, is such a wily and playful actress that in 'The Young Victoria,' she makes her twinkly ivory radiance fit the role. Her beauty comes off not as the usual period eye candy but as an expression of Victoria's inner grace -- her deceptive ability to go with the flow."

The Village Voice:
"Man, British heritage cinema can be dull when assembly-lined for the export market. Laboring under lampshade millinery, hair that looks like cake, and more sumptuous banqueting than we should ever have to sit through, Emily Blunt is cute, sassy, and wildly improbable as the titular Majesty-in-waiting, who, in life, was a short, dumpy policy wonk and energetic social reformer."

The New York Observer:
"In the otherwise somber 'The Young Victoria,' vivacious Emily Blunt, who did so much for stiletto heels in 'The Devil Wears Prada,' puts a modern spin on the famously poised and longest-reigning monarch in British history. This is a lavish and lovingly detailed period piece that attempts to re-create England's last golden age, but the enchanting Ms. Blunt is the whole movie, and it wouldn't register even a small bleep on the Richter scale without her. She puts the Vicki in the young Victoria."

Time Out New York:
"This isn't your great-great-great grandfather's highness, all unamused frowns; this Victoria is a wide-eyed Emily Blunt, cooing at her doggie and getting busy with her future husband (Rupert Friend). (Director Jean-Marc) Vallée and his lead get high marks for kittenish revisionism. In all other respects, however, this movie is indistinguishable from every other throne-and-scepter biopic to hit the screen."

Metromix:
"Of course the sets are lavish. Blunt also acquits herself nicely to a withdrawn role, and for a few minutes the film makes internal politics within the palace seem interesting. Mostly 'The Young Victoria' is just an unfocused tale of royal fussiness-surrounded by a bland love story, which is then followed by a closing note about all the wonderful things Victoria went on to do. It's presented as if to say, 'By the way, here's why you should care about what you just slept through.'"

The Herald Sun (Australia):
"With original casting choice Keira Knightley quite rightly having been deemed too skinny'n'chinny for the lead role, Emily Blunt takes over with surprising aplomb. Which is just as well, because the script for 'The Young Victoria' is a tad flat."
British period dramas typically deliver non-stop emotional thrill rides.
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