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It's easy to dismiss the aspiring actors in superhero garb who patrol Hollywood Boulevard's Walk of Fame as near-homeless-panhandlers.

But, in truth, costumed individuals -- like the four people profiled in Matthew Ogens' 2007 documentary 'Confessions of a Superhero' -- are actually recognized by some Hollywood city officials as "ambassadors for the community," and are as iconic to the tourists who flock to Hollywood as the Walk of Fame itself.

This fascinating study of fame and its castoffs is our pick for free movie of the day. It's easy to dismiss the aspiring actors in superhero garb who patrol Hollywood Boulevard's Walk of Fame as near-homeless-panhandlers.

But, in truth, costumed individuals -- like the four people profiled in Matthew Ogens' 2007 documentary 'Confessions of a Superhero' -- are actually recognized by some Hollywood city officials as "ambassadors for the community," and are as iconic to the tourists who flock to Hollywood as the Walk of Fame itself.

This fascinating study of fame and its castoffs is our pick for free movie of the day.

Despite tourist appreciation, the street performers in Ogens' documentary have their detractors. One police officer describes them as "annoying" and goes to lengths to make sure the performers clearly understand where public property ends and private property begins. The mayor of Hollywood considers them a nuisance and just wants them removed altogether. Even Stan Lee, co-creator of a vast range of beloved superhero characters, describes people who choose to wear costumes in public as idiotic.

Christopher Dennis, who dresses like Superman, is a Man of Steel obsessive and former meth addict with nearly $100,000 dollars in Superman paraphernalia. Jennifer Gehrt, Hollywood Boulevard's Wonder Woman, is a former homecoming queen from Kentucky who married her husband in Vegas and had her wedding reception feast at McDonald's. Joseph McQueen, the Incredible Hulk, is an African-American who sold his Super Nintendo, bought a Greyhound bus ticket to L.A. and arrived shortly after the Rodney King riots had begun. And Maxwell Allen, Batman, is a Texas transplant who struggles with anger management issues.

Although wildly different, these four people are united by a desire for fame, and the willingness to eke out a pittance by dressing in outlandish costumes and posing for tourist photos for tips. "Sure, a doctor saves lives, but is he remembered?" asks Gehrt. "Is he there for all times? People are still talking about Marilyn Monroe. People are still talking about Elvis Presley. People in the entertainment business are forever here."

Rather than a condemnation of loonies living on the fringe, Ogens' film is instead a respectful, sympathetic portrayal of four people who have bought into America's obsession with celebrity and, despite their best efforts, are operating at Hollywood's lowest level.

Watch 'Confessions of a Superhero' on SlashControl!