CATEGORIES Movies
We've been hearing for a while now that a third 'Ghostbusters' installment was looking likely -- and boy did we have our fingers crossed -- but details have been hard to come by ... until now.

In an interview last week with Channel 4 News promoting 'Avatar,' Sigourney Weaver confirmed that 'Ghostbusters 3' is going to be a reality. Additionally, Weaver revealed a few juicy plot points for the new film. The script is still being written, so the details may change -- but these could be major spoilers, so proceed with caution! We've been hearing for a while now that a third 'Ghostbusters' installment was looking likely -- and boy did we have our fingers crossed -- but details have been hard to come by ... until now.

In an interview last week with Channel 4 News promoting 'Avatar,' Sigourney Weaver confirmed that 'Ghostbusters 3' is going to be a reality. Additionally, Weaver revealed a few juicy plot points for the new film. The script is still being written, so the details may change -- but these could be major spoilers, so proceed with caution!

Weaver said:

"I know that my little son Oscar -- who was kidnapped from me -- I think he has grown up to be a Ghostbuster.

"I might be in it; I see nothing wrong with being in it, although I don't think I will have a big part. I think Bill Murray has a little more to do with it -- I think he might be a ghost."

The news that a grown-up Oscar will appear in the film seems to confirm earlier word that the series' third installment would focus on a new group of Ghostbusters. In an interview with the LA Times last May, Dan Aykroyd indicated that the premise would feature the original 'Ghostbusters' team passing the torch to a new generation.

It has been rumored for years that Murray would do 'Ghostbusters 3' only if he could play a ghost, but in recent interviews Murray has played coy as to whether he would actually do the film. Weaver's comments seem to indicate that a draft of the new script -- which is being written by 'The Office' scribes Lee Eisenberg and Gene Stupnitsky -- is nearing completion.

Still, plenty of questions remain, including an all-important one: Who will direct? Ivan Reitman, director of the first two films, is a producer of the project, as is Harold Ramis -- it seems likely one of them would direct, but it is possible that the film's "passing of the torch" premise will extend to the director's chair as well.