Some people embody a role so thoroughly, you can't picture anyone else doing it. Think Jamie Foxx as Ray Charles, Michael Sheen as Tony Blair and, of course, Tina Fey as Sarah Palin.

When it was announced that Morgan Freeman would play the role of Nelson Mandela in the upcoming film 'Invictus,' film lovers around the world shouted "It's about time." Both in resemblance and gravitas, portraying the formerly imprisoned political prisoner and president of South Africa seemed like the role Freeman was destined to play (that and the voice of God but he's already done that ... twice.) We thought it'd be a good time to look at some other "dream roles" that we'd love to see. Some people embody a role so thoroughly, you can't picture anyone else doing it. Think Jamie Foxx as Ray Charles, Michael Sheen as Tony Blair and, of course, Tina Fey as Sarah Palin.

When it was announced that Morgan Freeman would play the role of Nelson Mandela in the upcoming film 'Invictus,' film lovers around the world shouted "It's about time." Both in resemblance and gravitas, portraying the formerly imprisoned political prisoner and president of South Africa seemed like the role Freeman was destined to play (that and the voice of God but he's already done that ... twice.) We thought it'd be a good time to look at some other "dream roles" that we'd love to see.

Clint Eastwood as Ronald Reagan
The meticulous way of speaking and economy of words. The steely-eyed squint. The measured tone of voice. Politics aside, the 79-year-old Eastwood could nail the role of the former U.S. president. Throw in the fact that both men are former politicians from California -- method acting at its finest -- and it's a no-brainer.


Felicity Huffman as Hillary Clinton
The 'Desperate Housewives' star has spent six seasons wallowing in gossip, innuendo and extramarital affairs, so playing a politician shouldn't be too much of a stretch. Sure, she's a little younger than our current Secretary of State and former first lady, but makeup can do wonders.


Cate Blanchett as Princess D
To portray one of the most beloved people on the planet, you're going to need someone with that perfect mix of grace, poise and glamor. Blanchett has them all and has already portrayed a living person (as Katharine Hepburn in 'The Aviator') and royalty in 1998's 'Elizabeth' and the 2007 sequel 'Elizabeth: The Golden Age.'


Naomi Watts as Grace Kelly
Like Princess Di, former actress and Princess of Monaco Grace Kelly was a beloved, influential figure who met a tragic end in a car accident (ironically, Princess Di represented the Royal Family at the funeral.) And yes, having Australian actresses portraying British and American figures, respectively, may be sacrilege to some, but Watts proved in 'Mulholland Drive,' among others, that she has the American accent down pat.


Bridget Moynahan as Jackie Kennedy
As a former model, 'I, Robot' and 'Lord of War' actress Bridget Moynahan is used to being scrutinized and displaying class in a public setting. This will help in her role as one of the most popular first ladies in U.S. history (sorry, Lucretia Garfield.)



Antonio Banderas
as Julio Iglesias
One makes countless women swoon on the screen. One makes countless women swoon on stage. Both use their alluring voices to bring chaos and mayhem to overexcited, middle-aged women wherever they go. One, if cinema has taught us anything, is a King of Mambo. And to all you naysayers who doubt Banderas' singing ability ... check out this video:



Andre 3000 as Jimi Hendrix
No one can fully emulate the unique otherworldliness of Jimi Hendrix, but Andre 3000, one-half of pioneering Atlanta hip-hop group Outkast and budding fashion icon, may come the closest. He knows about taking risks and creating music that flies in the face of current trends and, like Hendrix, makes sure to surround himself with the latest stylish wares.



Harry Connick Jr.
as Frank Sinatra
Casual fans of Big Band revivalist and jazz singer Harry Connick Jr. may not know the crooner has made memorable impressions in films such as 'Memphis Belle,' 'Independence Day' and as a psychopath in 'Copycat.' Playing the Chairman of the Board in a movie -- and let's face it, doesn't he do that most nights already anyway? -- should be a cinch.


Jessica Simpson as Dolly Parton
She's already proved she's got the chops with Oscar nominations for Best Actress for her work in 'Employee of the Month' and 'The Dukes of Hazzard.' With her long blonde hair, Southern twang and ample ... singing ability, Simpson should be a lock for any potential Dolly biopic.


Hilary Swank as Martina Navratilova
As a defector from the former Czechoslovakia, political activist, outspoken gay rights activist and, arguably, the greatest tennis player of all time, Martina Navratilova's life is ripe for biopic treatment. Swank has already played two real-life characters before: Brandon Teena in 'Boys Don't Cry' and Amelia Earhart in 'Amelia.' Whether she could pull the accent off is another story.



Tracy Morgan
as Mike Tyson
Both men are, um, eccentric to say the least, so Morgan's charisma and unique, larger-than-life personality would lend itself well to the outsized former boxer and Phil Collins admirer. We'd also recommend a separate accompanying documentary showing Morgan's strict, monkish regimen to turn his body into a heavyweight boxing champion. Some will call it a reverse 'Raging Bull.' We call it an Oscar.


Eddie Murphy as Richard Pryor
It's too bad conflicts with the studio put the kibosh on Murphy's planned role as the iconoclastic comedian, as now we can only imagine, after 'The Adventures of Pluto Nash' and 'Norbit,' just how Travoltian Murphy's comeback could have been.


And our "Not Real Person, But Still Dream Role" Award goes to:

Jennifer Tilly
as Betty Boop
Would a Betty Boop fake biopic be a hit with audiences? Who cares. We just want to see Jennifer Tilly in her Role of a Lifetime. The high-pitched, cooing voice. The overt sex appeal. The short, low-cut dresses. Surely, there must be some horny, budding producer ready to run with this.
CATEGORIES Features