Two men attending a bachelor party in Canada discovered that Adam Sandler's iconic golf swing from the 1996 comedy classic 'Happy Gilmore' is apparently not so funny to the Nova Scotia Supreme Court, writes Hollywood Wiretap.

According to the court, the swing is defined as "running from five to ten feet behind the ball and hitting it on the run." The Sandler swing has been found to breach a duty of care on the course, reports The Hollywood Reporter Esquire. Two men attending a bachelor party in Canada discovered that Adam Sandler's iconic golf swing from the 1996 comedy classic 'Happy Gilmore' is apparently not so funny to the Nova Scotia Supreme Court, writes Hollywood Wiretap.

According to the court, the swing is defined as "running from five to ten feet behind the ball and hitting it on the run." The Sandler swing has been found to breach a duty of care on the course, reports The Hollywood Reporter Esquire.

Law.com's Legal Blog Watch reports that the bachelor party bros were smoking pot and drinking tequila and beers prior to even reaching the third hole. The defendant has been found liable after the 'Happy Gilmore' swing struck the plaintiff in the wrist and chest, permanently damaging his radial nerve.

The plaintiff, a woodsman, hasn't been able to return to work since the incident.

Judge Arthur J. LeBlanc ruled that "the defendant's behavior was not among the 'natural risks' of golfing to which the plaintiff can be said to have consented."

Padraig Harrington, the Irish PGA golfer, has stated previously that "it's perfectly legal to use the 'Happy Gilmore' swing on the golf course."

Sandler's unorthodox swing seems to be a polarizing technique. Either way, it's safe to say this friendship is over. Friends might listen to 'Endless Love' in the dark, but they certainly don't do this to each other.
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