Looks like Wolverine is trading his adamantium for 'Steel.'

Variety is reporting that hunky Hugh Jackman will play a fighter who has to reinvent himself when human boxers are replaced by robots in 'Real Steel,' the first project to be produced by DreamWorks following the studio's split from Paramount.

As a struggling promoter of robot boxing, Jackman's character finds a discarded android that somehow always manages to win despite the odds. To add a little humanity to the buddy-robot dynamic, he will also discover that he has an 11-year-old son, and the pair bond while their unlikely robot brawls its way to the top.
Looks like Wolverine is trading his adamantium for 'Steel.'

Variety is reporting that hunky Hugh Jackman will play a fighter who has to reinvent himself when human boxers are replaced by robots in 'Real Steel,' the first project to be produced by DreamWorks following the studio's split from Paramount.

As a struggling promoter of robot boxing, Jackman's character finds a discarded android that somehow always manages to win despite the odds. To add a little humanity to the buddy-robot dynamic, he will also discover that he has an 11-year-old son, and the pair bond while their unlikely robot brawls its way to the top.

'Night at the Museum' helmer Shawn Levy is attached to direct, describing the film as "a rousing sports movie" and philosophically touting Jackman's character as "a former boxer who can no longer do the only job he's good at, and one particular robot that may be his return to grace."

The "'Rocky'-esque" plot is based on a short story by Richard Matheson and the script, penned by Dan Gilroy, has been floating around since 2005 when it was bought by DreamWorks for a reported $850,000. John Gatins rewrote the latest draft. The project is one of 17 that DreamWorks execs Steven Spielberg and Stacey Snider snagged in their split from Paramount last year, and the story is apparently one that Spielberg (no stranger to robots or sci-fi) has been itching to make.

"When we took it with us, we really highlighted it as something we would put the pedal to metal on," explained Mark Sourian, DreamWorks' co-president of production. "It's a project that Steven always wanted to do. It just came together rapidly after we left Paramount."

Spielberg plus sci-fi has long equaled box office gold, so it will be interesting to see if his newest tale of the Little Robot That Could will land a knock-out blow. Production begins in June for a 2011 release.
CATEGORIES Movies