Like a romantic version of Israel's Wailing Wall, countless people travel to Verona, Italy each year to leave messages for Juliet, the female side of William Shakespeare's legendary pair of lovers, many of which receive an answer by a rotating cadre of volunteers. After the release of the 2006 book 'Letters to Juliet,' director Gary Winick ('Bride Wars,' '13 Going on 30') brings the book to life with the upcoming film of the same name.
Like a romantic version of Israel's Wailing Wall, countless people travel to Verona, Italy each year to leave messages for Juliet, the female side of William Shakespeare's legendary pair of lovers, many of which receive an answer by a rotating cadre of volunteers. After the release of the 2006 book 'Letters to Juliet,' director Gary Winick ('Bride Wars,' '13 Going on 30') brings the book to life with the upcoming film of the same name.

When 'Mean Girls' and 'Mamma Mia!' alum Amanda Seyfried travels to Verona with fiancee Gael Garcia Bernal, she comes across a wall "where the heartbroken leave notes asking Juliet for her help." After discovering a 50-year old letter from a woman who abandoned plans to meet her lover, Seyfried assumes her inner Yente and writes back to the now-elderly woman (Vanessa Redgrave), hoping to rectify a lost love story a half-century in the making.



But oh, if rom-coms were that simple, Sandra Bullock would have no career. When Seyfried begins to fall for Redgrave's grandson (Christopher Egan, in a role originally planned for Hugh Dancy), so begins a dual tale of love triangles and forgotten love, all nicely played out under a postcard-perfect Italian backdrop.

Who will Seyfried end up with? Will Redgrave find her long-lost paramour Lorenzo (played by Redgrave's real-life husband Franco Nero)? Why couldn't the producers hire Nick Nolte to recreate his famed Italian accent from 'Lorenzo's Oil'? So many questions. But for now, check out the trailer and wait patiently for the film's May 7, 2010 release.