I may not be the biggest devotee of movie musicals, but I've been keeping an eye on Rob Marshall's adaptation of Nine (the Tony Award-winning musical) since the production was first announced back in 2007. The thought of some of the coolest chicks in Hollywood with Daniel Day Lewis in a musical about 8 1/2? Well, count me in. Despite early casting changes and rumblings about Lewis' singing abilities, I've held out hope for the flick, and now that the film's Christmas release date is a little over a month away the early reviews are trickling in. First up is AICN who scored an early review from a source going by the name of Tobby (You can read the entire review over there, but be warned, it's a little spoilery)

So let's start with the good news: according to this review, the film is pretty darn good. The reviewer had nothing but praise for Marion Cotillard as Lewis' wife, and even Fergie gets some love as the prostitute, Saraghina. As for Lewis in the role of the troubled director Guido Contini, it turns out those rumors of his lack of singing ability were just rumors, and he makes out pretty good in the review for the limited singing he does in the film (two songs) -- and I think we all knew his acting was never going to be the problem.

Of course, the film is far from perfect and there are some rough patches according to this reviewier. Most of the scorn was directed towards Nicole Kidman's performance as Contini's muse, and unfortunately one of the other problems with the film is Kate Hudson (who plays an American Vogue reporter) in what was described as a throwaway role. Bad timing, perhaps, now that Hudson's musical number, Cinema Italiano, is the bulk of the latest trailer for the film.

After the jump: Hudson's Go-Go debut and a musical layman's review of Cinema Italiano...

From what little I saw in the trailer, I have to agree with AICN's source. Hudson may be shimmying her heart out to this number, but it's kind of a crappy song (though you should probably know that I rank South Park: Bigger Longer and Uncut as one of the finest movie-musicals of all time, so you can take my opinion with a grain of salt). Hudson's number, titled Cinema Italiano, was not in the original musical, which is maybe why it stands out so much, and according to the early review, her role is a little weak overall. So while I may get that the purpose of Hudson's number in the film seems to be there to contrast bright shiny (and sometimes blind) American optimism against all that old world gloom and doom, and she does performs it perfectly, maybe it just wasn't the best choice for a new trailer.



As an added bonus, the far superior (at least to me) original trailer. It's just a much catchier tune, don't you think?