Talk about a bad hair day.

A federal court in Los Angeles has refused to stop the release of Chris Rock's 'Good Hair,' a comic documentary that takes a look at the way hairstyles influence the activities, pocketbooks, sexual relationships and self-esteem of the black community. Talk about a bad hair day.

A federal court in Los Angeles has refused to stop the release of Chris Rock's 'Good Hair,' a comic documentary that takes a look at the way hairstyles influence the activities, pocketbooks, sexual relationships and self-esteem of the black community.

The injunction was brought by Regina Kimbell, producer and director of 'My Nappy Roots: A Journey Through Black Hair-itage,' who alleges in a $5 million copyright infringement lawsuit that Rock copied substantial elements of her as-yet-unreleased 2005 documentary on the same subject.

According to the complaint, Kimbell screened her film for Rock in 2007 after winning the Pan African Film Festival's best documentary award, but also acknowledged that she knew Rock was already working on 'Good Hair' at that time.

According to a report in the Hollywood Reporter, "Ideas can't be copyrighted -- only the expression of ideas. ... Rock may have been inspired by some of the elements he saw on screen, but the bar for copyright infringement can be high in cases like this." According to Kimbell's suit, there are more than a dozen similarities between the two films.

The quashing of the injunction allows Rock's film to open wide this coming weekend; last week it earned more than $1 million on 186 screens.

"These motions are rarely granted," Kimbell's lawyer said, according to the Reporter. "We still feel optimistic on our copyright claim and we're on track to proceed."

'Good Hair' Trailer

'Good Hair' showtimes and tickets
CATEGORIES Movies