CATEGORIES The DL From LA
Greetings from Los Angeles, where the sun shines every day. It's sort of like 'Groundhog Day'.

I am a Canadian transplant who grew up in Toronto. I moved to LA to be immersed in the film centre of the world and, admittedly, the weather was a huge allure. Ah, this is what sunshine feels like. I no longer have to be concerned with snowstorms. I am liberated from road salt eating up the bottoms of all my jeans. Now, I deal with brushfires, smog, earthquakes and a dry air-induced skin condition.

Some Americans call me a "Frostback." Others have asked me if I had to wear snowshoes when I lived in Toronto. Um, no. Mostly, though, I have been embraced. They seem to love Canadians here. I think they perceive us as their kid siblings whom they love, but don't fully understand, eh.

In a city obsessed with entertainment, when people hear my first name, they often say "Pamela Anderson," as if they're playing a spontaneous game of word association. Why, yes, every Canadian woman is named Pamela. Greetings from Los Angeles, where the sun shines every day. It's sort of like 'Groundhog Day'.

I am a Canadian transplant who grew up in Toronto. I moved to LA to be immersed in the film centre of the world and, admittedly, the weather was a huge allure. Ah, this is what sunshine feels like. I no longer have to be concerned with snowstorms. I am liberated from road salt eating up the bottoms of all my jeans. Now, I deal with brushfires, smog, earthquakes and a dry air-induced skin condition.

Some Americans call me a "Frostback." Others have asked me if I had to wear snowshoes when I lived in Toronto. Um, no. Mostly, though, I have been embraced. They seem to love Canadians here. I think they perceive us as their kid siblings whom they love, but don't fully understand, eh.

In a city obsessed with entertainment, when people hear my first name, they often say "Pamela Anderson," as if they're playing a spontaneous game of word association. Why, yes, every Canadian woman is named Pamela.

Ever since I can remember, I have been in love with the entire film experience; picking up the tickets, choosing the perfect seat, eating popcorn, the lights dimming just before the movie starts and, of course, the films themselves. And, I will never forget the first boy who held my hand in a movie theatre. I can't believe he married someone else. I suppose we wouldn't have been allowed to get married at 12 years old anyway.

'Grease' was my first film obsession. I saw it 3 times in the theatre. I longed to be Olivia Newton John. I'd stand on the fireplace in our family's living room pretending to be "Sandy" at the Shake Shack. Of course, my parents wondered what their 7 year old daughter was doing on the fireplace wearing tights on her head (my substitute for long hair) and, at the top of her lungs, singing suggestive comments like, "Feel your way..."

I hail from a film obsessed family. Every year, my two older brothers and I would run around the Toronto International Film Festival catching as many films as we could. My mother would take me to see documentaries, independents and foreign films at art house theatres. My dad, on the other hand, has always said that he doesn't want to "think" or "feel" anything when he goes to the movies. He prefers action films and "a good murder." Really, who doesn't love a good murder? Given that parental combination, I was exposed to all kinds of films from a very young age.

As an adult, I spent many Canadian winters holing up in my apartment, hiding from the cold and watching rented films. Once special features were introduced, I could spend hours with a film. Sometimes, too many hours. Despite the fact I lived above a video store, I'd often forget to return movies on time. Actually, I hope I don't still owe them money.

Everywhere I go in Los Angeles, I am reminded of film. I hike in Griffith Park where James Dean rebelled without cause (and shot a Coca-Cola commercial). I drink at The Dresden where 'Swingers' was filmed. I live next to the building in which actor James LeGros used to live. And, one day, I am sure that half the waiters in my neighborhood will be making their livings on the silver screen. Until such time, excuse me, but may I please get my eggs over-easy with a side of buttered toast?

From the devastation of Bambi's mother being shot to Audrey Hepburn's iconic Holly Golightly to Jeremy Irons' Academy-Award winning performance as Klaus Von Bulow, I've always been wholly moved by film. My mood can be thoroughly elevated or lowered. I can be completely inspired to take on the world or, instead, to hide under my covers.

As can be expected, they take film very seriously in LA. At my local neighbourhood movie theatre, the cartoon which plays before the main attraction begins shows a cell phone being entirely dismantled. Apparently, they'd prefer that you completely destroy your phone rather than run the risk of you answering a call during a showing. Wow. Really? Maybe it's just me, but I think turning off one's cell phone should be enough.

At another local theatre, where 'Inglourious Basterds' was playing, the usher was dressed up as a soldier. At the end of films, LA-la-land audiences don't move. Everybody either works or knows someone who works in film, so until that last credit rolls, everyone remains seated. I generally use that time to get to the bathroom before anybody else.

Over the coming months, I will be reporting to you on all things film. So, sit back, relax and enjoy.

You can even keep your cell phone turned on.