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The recent news that Adrien Brody is being cast as the action lead in a new 'Predator' franchise has us a little bit worried. Brody has a unique combination of cool and edge, along with the requisite acting chops that made him great in 'The Pianist' and 'Summer of Sam.' And he's not so bad with a gun, as he displayed in 'The Thin Red Line' and 'King Kong.'

But jumping six neck sizes to take Arnold Schwarzenegger's place as an exterritorial-battling badass? Hmmm. Check out 10 other good (or even great) actors who ended up in the wrong place at the wrong time. The recent news that Adrien Brody is being cast as the action lead in a new 'Predator' franchise has us a little bit worried. Brody has a unique combination of cool and edge, along with the requisite acting chops that made him great in 'The Pianist' and 'Summer of Sam.' And he's not so bad with a gun, as he displayed in 'The Thin Red Line' and 'King Kong.'

But jumping six neck sizes to take Arnold Schwarzenegger's place as an exterritorial-battling badass? Hmmm. Check out 10 other good (or even great) actors who ended up in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Bill Murray in 'The Razor's Edge' (1984)
Murray is a really funny guy. He can also play sad. And sad plus funny equals lugubrious, which defines his brilliant turns in 'Rushmore' and 'Lost in Translation.' But, in the soul-searching drama 'The Razor's Edge,' it was his flat performance itself that was just plain sad.

Colin Farrell in 'Alexander' (2004)
Don't let the good looks fool you: Farrell has proven his acting talent in 'Tigerland' and 'Phone Booth,' and last year showed impressive range with 'In Bruges.' But donning golden locks and a matching skirt in this epic, he looked like an Irishman stumbling out of a pub into a nightmare of mistaken identities.

Katharine Hepburn in 'Dragon Seed' (1944)
Back in the day John Wayne could play Genghis Khan and Mickey Rooney could pass as a shrill "oriental" neighbor, so maybe we should give some slack for Hepburn's performance as Jade Tan, a tough-minded Chinese peasant. But, no, sorry Mrs. Hepburn: you set the bar too high to go so low.

Kirsten Dunst in 'Wimbledon' (2004)
Dunst can effortlessly flash her smile, charms or screams to great effect. And she demonstrated true acting prowess in 'The Cat's Meow' and 'Bring it On' (no, really). But her Lizzie Bradbury, tennis pro with love problems, was all wrong. No excuses, Kirsten, 'Wimbledon' was your double fault.
George Clooney in 'Batman & Robin' (1997)
He wasn't yet the gentleman movie star he's become. He hadn't met Steven Soderbergh. And he hadn't progressed from his one-note school of acting (tilt head, look up). So, what could he do behind that mask and nipple-suit? There was no place to hide.
Leonardo DiCaprio in 'Blood Diamond' (2006)
It was difficult to tell what hurt DiCaprio more; the squibs in his chest during his loooong death scene or his character's Rhodesian accent. We're guessing the latter, Academy Award nomination be damned.

Harrison Ford in 'K-19: The Widowmaker' (2002)
Don't fault Ford for being wooden at times. He flashed iconic charm in the 'Star Wars' and 'Indiana Jones' trilogies. And we liked him playing bad in 'What Lies Beneath.' But then 'K-19: The Widowmaker' put him in a sub playing a Russian captain with an over-the-top accent that had us screaming, "Nyet!"

Thandie Newton in 'W.' (2008)
We don't mean to pick on Oliver Stone (see 'Alexander'), but the director seemed to forget to tell Newton that her peers were not going to try to do impersonations of the real-life characters they played in this take on our 43rd president. Newton does an OK simulation of Condoleezza Rice, but she stretched her neck way too far for this one.

Cameron Diaz in 'Gangs of New York' (2002)
It's not Diaz's fault, really. Some faces just look period. Look at Helena Bonham Carter, Cate Blanchett, Kate Winslet. Even Gillian Anderson could pull it off. But not Diaz. Note to casting directors: Never put Megan Fox in an 18th century frock.

Liv Tyler in 'Reign Over Me' (2007)
Liv Tyler as a psychotherapist? Couldn't they have written her part as a dog walker? A massage therapist? A spiritual healer? It didn't make sense. It was hard enough to watch Adam Sandler play serious and depressed (without an assist from Paul Thomas Anderson), but Tyler's part brought back memories of Elisabeth Shue playing a scientist in 'The Saint.'