You'd think the creator of 'Trailer Park Boys' would be some loud, cantankerous boor, but in fact he's a rather reserved kind of guy, with a sincere face and friendly demeanour. The first thing he asks me is, 'Do you like swag?' Like any other human being, I answer "Of course," and before I know it he's literally pouring Laura Secord chocolates into my bag. I leave the interview with at least 200 of them.

Not to be too metaphorical, but Clattenburg is as sweet as sugar. He talks very fondly about this final 'Trailer Park Boys' movie, 'Trailer Park Boys: Countdown to Liquor Day', as if it were his child. There's a pride and joy in his voice, and it's not hard to tell how strongly he feels about the product he's made. Moviefone sat down to talk with Clattenburg about luck, swearing, and what he has planned for the future.

Warning: Some Spoilers Ahead...
You'd think the creator of 'Trailer Park Boys' would be some loud, cantankerous boor, but in fact he's a rather reserved kind of guy, with a sincere face and friendly demeanour. The first thing he asks me is, 'Do you like swag?' Like any other human being, I answer "Of course," and before I know it he's literally pouring Laura Secord chocolates into my bag. I leave the interview with at least 200 of them.

Not to be too metaphorical, but Clattenburg is as sweet as sugar. He talks very fondly about this final 'Trailer Park Boys' movie, 'Trailer Park Boys: Countdown to Liquor Day', as if it were his child. There's a pride and joy in his voice, and it's not hard to tell how strongly he feels about the product he's made. Moviefone sat down to talk with Clattenburg about luck, swearing, and what he has planned for the future.

So you're certain this will be the last 'Trailer Park Boys' film?

We did the show for 10 years. It felt right for me to end it around season 5. We had one more opportunity to make another film, so I thought, let's do it. Let's go out for one more summer, do some f---ing high-speed piss chases, grow f---ing dope plants, get drunk, all that crazy s--t.

Speaking of drunk, the movie is a drunken mess (in a classic 'TPB' way, of course)! John Dunsworth (Mr. Lahey) is so good at playing drunk.

It's funny, a lot of people think he's really drunk. He plays drunk by allowing his brain to disconnect, but he doesn't actually drink in real life. Amazing, eh? He's a fantastic actor.

Did you approach this movie in a different way, since you knew it was going to end?

Absolutely. We shot a tie-up-the-ends ending, but didn't use it. We didn't want to use that ending, and instead wanted something ironic. So it seems like everything's gone to s-t, but if you look at it, everything has kind of worked out for everybody, considering the circumstances.



And where else would they end up, but in prison?

I can understand them getting sick of jail, but I'd say Ricky is pretty much at home in prison. It's not the worst thing in the world for him, and hey - there's lots of dope in jail! There's also 50 cats in jail in the movie, so Bubbles likes it.

I'm always amazed at the popularity of 'TPB', even though it's distinctly East Coast. Why do you think it's able to transcend those provincial and national boundaries?

Everyone can recognize a Ricky, Julian, or Bubbles, or even a Mr. Lahey or Randy. All those characters, all the themes (like dysfunctional families, c'mon)...everyone has dysfunction, everybody has surrogate families, everybody cares about their friends. Alcoholism, weed, f---ed-up people. Everybody's just trying to make it in the world, keep it together in the midst of all that. We all relate to that s--t. And swearing, too.
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A Little Swearing With Your Show
Trailer Park Boys
A bunch of guys in a trailer park in Nova Scotia? Guaranteed there's going to be a lot of swearing. It's so commonplace it's literally part of the show's charm, and it never stops being funny. The at-times silly humour is almost like a cathartic release; we get so used to the swearing you hardly notice it as the show goes on. Ricky's car is named the 'S--tmobile', and he calls his brother 'F---in' Terry' - and believe me, this is just the tip of the iceberg.
Showcase
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A Little Swearing With Your Show

    Trailer Park Boys
    A bunch of guys in a trailer park in Nova Scotia? Guaranteed there's going to be a lot of swearing. It's so commonplace it's literally part of the show's charm, and it never stops being funny. The at-times silly humour is almost like a cathartic release; we get so used to the swearing you hardly notice it as the show goes on. Ricky's car is named the 'S--tmobile', and he calls his brother 'F---in' Terry' - and believe me, this is just the tip of the iceberg.

    Showcase

    South Park
    The original hellchild, 'South Park' broke all the taboos a long time ago, but somehow manages to take offensiveness to a new height each and every week. Several U.S. states have threatened to take the show off the air - and can we really blame them? What other show features a little boy killing another little boy's parents and then mixing their remains into chili, then feeding said chili to the dead parents' son? Whew! The swearing should be lower on the upset public's priority list.

    Comedy

    Hell's Kitchen
    The only reality show on the list takes place in the kitchen, which makes sense if you think about it. Head chef/host Gordon Ramsay is a notorious sailor-mouth. Often his diatribes are directed at poor chef wannabes, which can either be really funny or a bit over-the-top. His most recent food-based show is even called 'The F-Word'. Ramsay triggered a debate in the UK about banning swearing on TV - which, not surprisingly, never happened.

    AP

    Californication
    David Duchovny takes the starring role as a womanizing, sex-crazed writer, who doesn't even watch his language in front of his teenage daughter. Not that it really matters, because everyone else in the show (his ex-wife, his best friend, his many 'conquests') swears quite readily. A show so comfortable displaying various kinds of sex in all its glory can't possibly be concerned with a few harmless curses.

    AP

    The Sopranos
    The mobsters in 'The Sopranos' bring to life the more vulgar, scary form of swearing. While in some cases the cursing is humourous, in most instances it occurs when someone's getting beaten up, killed, or threatened. Literally every second or third word is 'f---' or 's--t', especially when Tony Soprano's in a scene. It all adds to the intensity of the show, though - which, incidentally, is enough to make your heart rate fly off the charts.

    AP

    Deadwood
    In television history, there has never been a show more criticized and praised for its swearing. One side of the argument is that a bunch of 1870s cowboys would use very foul language, so it's accurate. The other side insists that people in that era didn't use words like 'f---' and 's--t' to the nth degree. Either way, the show has so much swearing it's tough to get through a scene without expanding your vulgarity vocabulary. Even though the show's finished now, it's out there on DVD!

    AP

    Family Guy, American Dad
    Fox's Animation Domination features these two blockbuster cartoons, which go way past the line in terms of typical standards for crassness - which isn't to say they aren't funny. In fact, quite the opposite. When a show can make your jaw drop to the floor and propel you to ask, 'Are they allowed to do that?', it's done its job. And even though the swear words are usually bleeped out, the writers often find a way to sneak them in. (For example: Roger on 'American Dad': 'Man, she's being a real see-you-next-Tuesday)

    AP/Fox

    Rescue Me
    What should we expect from raunchy comedian Dennis Leary? (Remember his song from the late 90s? 'I'm an A--hole'?) Playing a New York City firefighter, he's constantly tormented by the death of his cousin in the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Even though he hopes for the best (in terms of reuniting with his divorced wife and estranged children), tragedy seems to wait for him around every corner. The swearing is subtle, yet frequent - what you would expect from a fireman.

    AP

    Sex and the City
    Yup, ladies can swear a blue streak as well. While their swearing isn't any more frequent than the average Joe/Joelle, they use frank sexual lingo so casually it's enough to make Madonna blush. Unquestionably, it has to be one of the reasons the show was so popular - finally, real television dialogue for women.

    HBO

    Curb Your Enthusiasm
    Imagine 'Seinfeld' with lots of swearing, and this is what you get. Starring 'Seinfeld' writer, co-creator, and executive producer Larry David as himself, 'CYE' takes the 'show about nothing' theme and runs with it. One of the more hilarious swearing-filled episodes involves a torrent of cursing, after Larry tries to help someone with Tourette's.

    AP


It's the glue that holds us together.

I personally find swearing very funny. I really do. You're starting to see a lot more of it now because it's funny, especially in American shows. People are frustrated, and it's a way to let it out. I could sit here and go, "F---, f---, f---, f---, f---," and it's not the swearing that's funny. It's the way it's sworn.

Has this show opened up a lot of doors for you?

'TPB' has been very successful, and it's played around the world, so it's opened a lot of doors for all of us. I'm very happy to be directing, writing stuff, and making films.

Very rarely does a Canadian director or TV writer get a chance to do their own stuff. You get to do something you really, truly enjoy, and without very much interference. Do you feel lucky?

Absolutely. I'm very fortunate, but we all worked very hard at it. We learned about it all - directing, acting, creating - and it was a hell of a ride. It hit at the right time, as well. There was nothing like this on TV...well, with the exception of 'Cops', perhaps [laughs]. The heart and soul and all the craziness, we never expected people to connect with it like they did.

How does the show fare in the US?

It's not commercialized or mainstream by any means. It's underground in a big way. American fans flew to the premiere, I hear from them all the time. A lot of celebrities watch it - though some of them I can't confirm nor deny. I know that Harrison Ford, when he was in Halifax filming 'K-19: The Widowmaker,' was watching the show and liked it. I know that Laura Dern likes it as well. I'm just as thrilled that the Newfoundland cabbies like it. When you meet these people, and they tell you to "watch out for s--thawks," it just feels great.

I've heard some criticisms about 'TPB', how the show denigrates and stereotypes poor people. What do you have to say to that?

These people are happy within their own means. They're not poor spiritually. They all love each other, but they don't have a lot of money. It's not an accurate portrayal of any trailer park or community.

In 'Countdown to Liquor Day', there was a running theme about dreams, goals, and the future. Was this deliberate, and why?

It's always been a running theme, the idea of success, of trying to get ahead. I think it really works with this film, and everyone finds success in a very unusual way. Conflict is totally present as well, mixed in with the quest for success. I mean, Mr. Lahey is in love with Julian, Success Auto Body fails miserably, and Bubbles doesn't get his cats out of the SPCA, so they all come across as failures. But when they shake it off, they realize that they actually ARE successful. The boys always have some get-rich-quick scheme, but I think in the end they're all successful.

'Trailer Park Boys: Countdown to Liquor Day' opens across Canada on September 25.