The 2009 Toronto Film Festival came to a close this weekend, with the Oprah-approved (and produced) 'Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire' taking home the fest's top prize, the People's Choice Award.

And while that movie is certainly scoring raves and plenty of Oscar buzz to boot, it's not the only movie getting attention coming out of Toronto. After the jump, check out 11 of the best-reviewed films of Toronto 2009. The 2009 Toronto Film Festival came to a close this weekend, with the Oprah-approved (and produced) 'Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire' taking home the fest's top prize, the People's Choice Award.

And while that movie is certainly scoring raves and plenty of Oscar buzz to boot, it's not the only movie getting attention coming out of Toronto. Below, check out 11 of the best-reviewed films of Toronto 2009.

'Precious: Based on the Novel Push by Sapphire': "It's a once-in-a-blue-moon experience that tests the boundaries of film, with an electrifying, positively Oscar-worthy performance by salty stand-up comic Mo'Nique, as the most monstrous mother on the planet." [The New York Observer review]

'Up in the Air': "['Up in the Air'] is as strident about the notion that a life without a family is worthless as any movie I've ever seen. Fortunately, it is also brisk, funny, and not enslaved to genre conventions. Parts of the film, in fact, approach comic brilliance." [Cinematical review]

'Youth in Revolt': "Thanks to a wickedly hilarious performance from Michael Cera (easily the best of his career), this brainy teenage sex comedy does manage to dole out a handful of great scenes, making it worthy of your hard-earned box office dollars." [Cinematical review]


'Love and Other Impossible Pursuits': "Natalie Portman delivers an utterly fearless performance in 'Love and Other Impossible Pursuits,' playing a bitter, borderline unlikable Manhattan home-wrecker subsumed by grief over the death of her infant daughter." [Variety review]

'Capitalism" A Love Story': "'Capitalism' "redeems itself because it possesses the same quality that has inspired our country in the last year – hope." [Cinematical review]




'The Road': "Director John Hillcoat has performed an admirable job of bringing Cormac McCarthy's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel to the screen as an intact and haunting tale, even at the cost of sacrificing color, big scenes and standard Hollywood imagery of post-apocalyptic America." [The Hollywood Reporter review]

'The Men Who Stare at Goats': "A serendipitous marriage of talent in which all hearts seem to beat as one, 'The Men Who Stare at Goats' takes Jon Ronson's book about 'the apparent madness at the heart of U.S. military intelligence' and fashions a superbly written loony-tunes satire, played by a tony cast at the top of its game." [Variety review]


'The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus':"['Parnassus'] feels sort of like a favorite uncle just burst through the door, smiling and loaded with nifty presents." [Cinematical review]




'The Invention of Lying': "'The Invention of Lying' is a smartly written, nicely layered comedy that, like last year's underappreciated 'Ghost Town,' casts Ricky Gervais as a mild-mannered schlub who manages, in spite of himself, to make the world a better place. [Variety review]


'A Serious Man': "This movie is utterly assured, personal, serious, sad and very funny. The Coens are in top form. And they leave us with yet another brilliant provocative ending." [Anne Thompson's review]

Get all of Moviefone's Toronto Film Fest coverage
Toronto Film Festival Highlights: Sept. 14-18
Toronto Film Festival's most-hyped movies
Toronto Film Festival Coverage on Cinematical
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