Vampires are hot right now, in case you didn't know because you happen to be some kind of cave-dwelling lycanthrope who's never come across a copy of Entertainment Weekly. From 'True Blood' to 'Twilight' to the new Canadian rock movie 'SUCK', you can't turn around these days without seeing something about sexy bloodsuckers. So why are we such fang-bangers all of a sudden?

Rob Stefaniuk, writer, director and star of 'SUCK', has his own theory. "I think vampires have always been popular, but right now someone has tied into that teen market, which is probably why it feels like the genre is exploding," he says, referring, of course, to Stephanie Meyer's 'Twilight' franchise.


Vampires are hot right now, in case you didn't know because you happen to be some kind of cave-dwelling lycanthrope who's never come across a copy of Entertainment Weekly. From 'True Blood' to 'Twilight' to the new Canadian rock movie 'SUCK', you can't turn around these days without seeing something about sexy bloodsuckers. So why are we such fang bangers all of a sudden?

Rob Stefaniuk, writer, director and star of 'SUCK', has his own theory. "I think vampires have always been popular, but right now someone has tied into that teen market, which is probably why it feels like the genre is exploding," he says, referring, of course, to Stephanie Meyer's 'Twilight' franchise.

While vampires may be the undead of the moment, interest in the genre appears to be cyclical – each decade boasts its own vampire feeding frenzy. 'Nosferatu', released in 1922, arguably piqued interest in the genre, but it was 1931's 'Dracula' starring Bela Lugosi that made it clear vampire movies were here to stay.

Since then, Roman Polanski has poked fun at the genre with 1967's 'The Fearless Vampire Killers', Kiefer Sutherland made vampires appealing to teens everywhere in 1987's 'The Lost Boys', and Brad Pitt epitomized the sensitive, tortured vampire in 1994's 'Interview With the Vampire'. And, who could forget 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer', the TV series that roped in the all-important teen market and essentially paved the way for this decade's Twilight phenomenon.

Ironically, Stefaniuk didn't initially set out to make a vampire film. 'SUCK' is a rock 'n roll movie at its core, following the ups and downs of a band on the road. "So many band movies are the same – I wanted to do something different," he says. Rock stars getting into drugs has become a cliché, he says, so he decided to use vampirism as a metaphor to make things more interesting.

The concept resonated with some big names, and helped Stefaniuk land cameos from the likes of Iggy Pop, Alice Cooper, Malcolm McDowell, Moby and Henry Rollins. "I just sent Iggy an email. He liked the script. It was that simple," says Stefaniuk. Once Iggy Pop signed on, the others followed.

"It was so surreal," says Stefaniuk, recalling the first time he called Iggy Pop. "He was my hero growing up, and now he's on the other end of the phone saying 'Hello? Rob, yeah, I have some questions for you.'"

With the exception of Moby (who has a hilarious turn as Beef, the meat-loving metal singer from Buffalo's most popular band, Secretary of the Steak), none of the musicians participate in the film's musical interludes. "We made them all act - they weren't just doing cameos as themselves," says Stefaniuk. "There was very little direction needed for these guys. They all showed up and did their jobs, which was key since we shot the whole film in 20 days."

Canadian sweetheart Jessica Pare plays Jennifer, the bass player in the fictional band The Winners. Pare is the first band member to fall prey to the dark side; she is seduced by Queeny, an alluring vampire played by Dimitri Coats. Becoming a vampire increases Jennifer's mystique and sex appeal, which piques the public's interest in the band. Stefaniuk plays the lead singer, who becomes irked by all of the attention being diverted to Jennifer.

Despite its roots in rock 'n roll, 'SUCK' will surely benefit from the current vampire hype as it debuts at the Toronto International Film Festival this month. "Who knows, when it hits theatres people may be over vampires," says Stefaniuk, laughing. Montreal band The Burning Brides, fronted by Coats, will perform at Toronto's Dundas Square during TIFF, giving passersby a taste of 'SUCK's meaty soundtrack (two of the band's songs are featured in the movie).

Whether our obsession with vampires is here to stay or on the wane, one thing is for certain: somebody will soon bring sexy vampires back again, not to worry.