Cinematical has just received these images and this exclusive clip from the film Get Low, which is set to have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival later this month. Starring Bill Murray, Robert Duvall, Lucas Black and Sissy Spacek, Get Low is described as a "big-hearted Southern yarn" about a quirky 1930s Tennessee hermit named Felix Bush (Duvall) who decides to throw his own funeral party while he's still alive. From the official synopsis: "A life-long "wild man" and misfit, Felix has been nearly swallowed up by the power of his town's sinister myths about him – until he finds the courage on his own "funeral day" to make a shocking confession about why he turned away from society. The result is a comic, poignant, at times haunting tale about the snowballing nature of secrets, stories and heartbreak – and the redemption of telling the truth."

Aaron Schneider directs off a script he co-wrote alongside folks like C. Gaby Mitchell (Blood Diamond) and Chris Provenzano. Get Low currently doesn't have distribution, but I can't see it stalling on the market for too long with this fantastic cast. Just the thought of watching Murray and Duvall bounce off each other makes me want to purchase a plane ticket to Toronto, like, yesterday.

Check out two photos from the film below, and the clip after the jump.


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A big-hearted Southern yarn, Get Low is a movie spun out of equal parts folk tale, fable and real-life legend about the mysterious, 1930s Tennessee hermit who famously threw his own rollicking funeral party . . . while he was still alive. Academy Award® winner Robert Duvall, Golden Globe winner Bill Murray, Academy Award® winner Sissy Spacek and Lucas Black form an ensemble of unforgettable characters who bring to life the surprising last act of Felix Bush. A life-long "wild man" and misfit, Felix has been nearly swallowed up by the power of his town's sinister myths about him – until he finds the courage on his own "funeral day" to make a shocking confession about why he turned away from society. The result is a comic, poignant, at times haunting tale about the snowballing nature of secrets, stories and heartbreak – and the redemption of telling the truth