The concept of injecting contemporary horror tropes into classic literature is nothing new. Writer Seth Grahame-Smith kicked off the trend earlier this year with Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and things snowballed from there. Titles like The War of the Worlds Plus Blood, Guts and Zombies and the forthcoming Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters shared in the buzz, but one entry seems to have escaped the spotlight: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Zombie Jim.

Now I admit to having not read any of the titles above, because, well, they seem lazy. Call me an elitist, but piggybacking off of the well respected work of others doesn't strike me as very original, particularly when the zombies serve no purpose other than a sales gimmick (though if you think I'm shooting from the hip here, read Elisabeth's review). I am, however, interested in W. Bill Czolgosz's twist on Mark Twain's classic tale. Judging solely from its Amazon description, Finn and Zombie Jim looks to completely transform Huckleberry's entire world while keeping the core allegory intact.

I hope I'm not the only one who thinks it sounds awesome:


It's nineteenth century America and a mutant strain of tuberculosis is bringing its victims back from the dead. Sometimes they come back docile, and other times vicious. The vicious ones are sent back to Hell, but the docile ones are put to work as servants and laborers. With so many zombies on the market, the slave trade is nonexistant. The black man is at liberty, and human bondage is no more. Young Huckleberry Finn has grown up in a world that shuns the N-word, with its scornful eye set on a new class of shambling, putrid sub-humans: The Baggers. When his abusive father comes back into his life, Huck flees down the river with Bagger Jim, seeking a life of perfect freedom. When the pox mutates once again, causing even the tamest of baggers to become bloodthirsty monsters, the boy Finn is forced to question his relationship with his dearest, deadest friend. In this revised take on history and classic literature, the modern age is ending before it ever begins. Huckleberry Finn will inherit a world of horror and death, and he knows the mighty Mississippi might be the only way out...

Thanks to Buy Zombie for the heads up.