It's been awhile since I got to break out the old Geek Daily graphic. I've really missed it! Today, it's coming in handy thanks to a smattering of news and rumors ...

First, Entertainment Weekly is reporting that Cameron Diaz is in talks to play the female lead in The Green Hornet. Her reps declined to comment. She'd be a natural against Seth Rogen, that's for sure. I still don't even know what to make of this project, but I do want it to get underway so I can judge it with a little less of a kneejerk reaction.

Spider-Man 4 has a new writer, says The Hollywood Reporter. Gary Ross has been brought on to do a rewrite. Ross has worked with Tobey Maguire before on Seabiscuit and Pleasantville, and is collaborating with him on Toyko Suckerpunch. He's the third screenwriting heavyweight to tackle it, as James Vanderbilt and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright David Lindsay-Abaire have both tried to crack the web-spinner. Should we start seeing red flags? Or will the combo of Vanderbilt, Ross, and Lindsay-Abaire make something Shakespearean out of Spider-Man?

Edgar Wright told Omelete that he's eager to return to Ant-Man, and plans to return to the erstwhile Avenger once Scott Pilgrim is done. "Ant Man is something that I need to return to. I wrote a draft before Scott Pilgrim started and it's kind on back burner slightly just because I've been busy with this. But it's something that I have got to return to. I have to do another draft after Scott Pilgrim is done ... When you come away from something it's good and fun to rework what you've already done. But I'm very happy with the first draft and we need to get back into business." [via Collider]

More below the jump ...


Marc Guggenheim once hinted there might be a Superman cameo in The Green Lantern. He couldn't tell the Splash Page whether or not it still exists, but he did reveal that you can't really believe any rumor you hear about the Emerald Knight. "Honestly, it changes on a daily basis. Whatever information I gave you today would be obsolete in a week, and maybe come back again in two weeks. And even if it wasn't in flux at the script stage, it would still be constantly in flux because you can film it, put it in the original cut, and eventually it could end up on the editing room floor ... I will say, all the Easter Eggs and the cameos that I put in, I couldn't even begin to predict at this point which ones will stay and which ones will go. I'll be as interested as anyone else to see what we end up keeping and losing by the time the picture is actually locked ... and that's pretty far away from now."

An anonymous source told Comics2Film that Stephen Norrington's remake of The Crow isn't going to be a remake after all. It's a "very different from the original - a whole new story about a whole new character." Norrington already promised a whole new take when the news was announced in December, insisting it would shy away from Alex Proyas' Gothic gloom. "Whereas [Alex] Proyas' original was gloriously gothic and stylized, the new movie will be realistic, hard-edged and mysterious, almost documentary-style." I doubt that'll pacify the fanbase who doesn't even want to see it touched, though ...