Don't get me wrong. I'm a big fan of strange movie tie-in merchandise. I have the Reservoir Dogs cutting-the-cop's-ear-off playset. My go-to ruler on my desk is a 13-incher from Wonderland, the 1993 movie about John Holmes. Hell, I still have my Fargo snow globe.

But ... this is just bizarre. The Terminator Salvation Bobble Head, bringing an unstoppable killing machine from the future to wacky, head-nodding life.

I don't really get the whole bobble-head phenomenon, anyway. It seems to be about taking iconic, recognizable figures, blowing their heads way up out of proportion, then sticking 'em on springs so that they waggle around. They're ugly, and their function is ... well, stupid. How are these fun toys?

And when you make one out of something that's already scary? Now they're just perverse. And you know, if Terminators were real, as soon as they saw these they'd hunt down the people who make them and, um, pick them up and toss them around until they got away, which seems to be all that Terminators actually do, especially in Salvation.

Apparently anything's a target for bobble-headification. We all know about the Dwight Shrute bobble head from The Office (okay, that one's kind of funny), but there are also bobble heads of "The Dude" Lebowski, Jeff Probst from Survivor, the Nesquick bunny, every sports star in every sport, and Anna Nicole Smith. There are entire websites devoted to selling nothing but bobble heads (you'll have to Google them yourself).

The Terminator: Salvation toy falls into a category of "weird and just plain wrong" bobble heads that includes the characters from Showtime's serial-killer show Dexter, Chucky from Child's Play, and the invader robot from the Twilight Zone -- who doesn't even have a proper head! I assume just his antenna thing is going to bobble, which is cheating, as far as I'm concerned.

The Terminator: Salvation bobble head retails for $10.99, and is temporarily out of stock at Entertainment Earth. Which means that it was popular enough that they sold them all. W.T.F.?
CATEGORIES Cinematical